23' & 26' Hourston Project Commenced...

What to do?

  • Try and keep the boat and complete the project.

    Votes: 71 72.4%
  • Sell the boat in current hot market.

    Votes: 8 8.2%
  • Notch the transom for outboard.

    Votes: 4 4.1%
  • Add extension bracket for outboard.

    Votes: 56 57.1%
  • Install twin outboards.

    Votes: 41 41.8%
  • Install single outboard.

    Votes: 27 27.6%
  • Add command bridge.

    Votes: 15 15.3%
  • Remove command bridge.

    Votes: 42 42.9%
  • Accept "crowd funding"

    Votes: 28 28.6%
  • Do not accept "crowd funding"

    Votes: 16 16.3%

  • Total voters
    98

Robert Snyder

Well-Known Member

Robert Snyder

Well-Known Member
OK, so here is another video I just put together on the command bridge, I should have another by the end of the week...

 

RiverBoy

Well-Known Member
thanks for posting. so after the second attempt do you apply another layer of chop strand over the entire surface ? i know nothing about fibreglass work
 

Robert Snyder

Well-Known Member
thanks for posting. so after the second attempt do you apply another layer of chop strand over the entire surface ? i know nothing about fibreglass work

Hey, to be honest I haven't decided if I will apply a layer or two of glass over the dash or not... I have some work to the underside yet and holes to infill so still considering that option. Thank you for the reply!

Rob
 

Sir Reel

Well-Known Member
Hey Rob.
You may want to look at raising your hydraulic cylinder and battery on your trailer. I had a similar setup and depending on your launch conditions you can get salt water in to them.
I had to replace my battery a couple of times as the terminals would corrode off.
You can see some other trailers have a raised post to mount then on to keep them dry.
 

Robert Snyder

Well-Known Member
Hey Rob.
You may want to look at raising your hydraulic cylinder and battery on your trailer. I had a similar setup and depending on your launch conditions you can get salt water in to them.
I had to replace my battery a couple of times as the terminals would corrode off.
You can see some other trailers have a raised post to mount then on to keep them dry.

that is a great idea, does Road Runner sell the gal post for this mod? Thanks
 

Eden Island

Active Member
OK, so here is another video I just put together on the command bridge, I should have another by the end of the week...

Thanks for posting - unfortunately there's often more to be learned from failure than success, but it takes a big man to share a failure. I definitely learned a thing or two from your post, and wish you success going forward.
 

Robert Snyder

Well-Known Member
Not sure as I had a different brand.
Its something like this though.

View attachment 49130

Hey, this looks awesome and practical to remedy the problem/concern as you described, I will be sure to as around for a galvanized riser. If you or anyone else can point me to were this can be purchased i would greatly appreciate it... thank you

Rob
 
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Robert Snyder

Well-Known Member
Thanks for posting - unfortunately there's often more to be learned from failure than success, but it takes a big man to share a failure. I definitely learned a thing or two from your post, and wish you success going forward.

Thank you sir, it was still fun to do! O well...my next video hopefully by the end of this week will prove to have better results :D
 

Rayvon

Well-Known Member
You'll get better results if you use a non porous material as a backup piece. A cheap way is to glue arborite on your plywood,the PVA will sit on top and not penetrate and your layup will not stick (guaranteed). Any countertop business will give you their scrap cut offs.There are lots of other materials that resin won't stick to (plastic buckets etc.) but not all plastics,the resin + catalyst will melt some plastics like plexy. PM me if you like,I've done lots of fiberglass work over the years.Ray
 

Robert Snyder

Well-Known Member
You'll get better results if you use a non porous material as a backup piece. A cheap way is to glue arborite on your plywood,the PVA will sit on top and not penetrate and your layup will not stick (guaranteed). Any countertop business will give you their scrap cut offs.There are lots of other materials that resin won't stick to (plastic buckets etc.) but not all plastics,the resin + catalyst will melt some plastics like plexy. PM me if you like,I've done lots of fiberglass work over the years.Ray

Thank you Ray, that is a great idea and I agree with your suggestions. If I used a plastic/non-porous surface, as you mentioned, rather than PVA, i'm sure it would have made a difference...
Rob
 
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Prfisher

Active Member
Cover your backing plates with Saran Wrap & it won’t stick.
Personally, I’d grind the back surface a bit & put a couple of layers on the backing plate (on top of the Saran Wrap) before screwing it on. Then quickly apply the fill layers.
Candle wax the screws if you’re worried about them getting stuck.
 
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Rayvon

Well-Known Member
If your thinking about adding more fiberglass to stiffen the dash do it on the back side and add a piece of plywood behind the area where the steering and controls will be.Of course this will be easier if you turn the bridge over so your not trying to glass upside down.
 

Rain City

Crew Member
If your thinking about adding more fiberglass to stiffen the dash do it on the back side and add a piece of plywood behind the area where the steering and controls will be.Of course this will be easier if you turn the bridge over so your not trying to glass upside down.
Was going to say. Some ropes or saw horses could really save your knees and your back. But judging by the way that shirt fits you're probably fine lol.
 

fish brain

Crew Member
I'm with Prfisher and Rayvon on this,
Grind back around the edges of the holes, at least 10% more than the diameter of the hole. Just placing the glass inside the hole only relies on the resin to hold the plug in and it will likely fall out over time in an exact replica of your repair. By grinding back around the edges the new glass can bind to the layers of the old glass. And by putting a couple of layers of matt under the back side you will have holding from both sides and it should be stronger than the original fiberglass
 

Robert Snyder

Well-Known Member
I'm with Prfisher and Rayvon on this,
Grind back around the edges of the holes, at least 10% more than the diameter of the hole. Just placing the glass inside the hole only relies on the resin to hold the plug in and it will likely fall out over time in an exact replica of your repair. By grinding back around the edges the new glass can bind to the layers of the old glass. And by putting a couple of layers of matt under the back side you will have holding from both sides and it should be stronger than the original fiberglass

Did it done it! haha, It will be in the new vid i briefly introduced this detail at the end of Part1... thx U
 
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