SFI Up date

Discussion in 'Important Meetings, Derbys and SFBC Get Togethers' started by Derby, Aug 17, 2016.

  1. Derby

    Derby Crew Member

    Special Meeting Notice



    SPORT FISHING ADVISORY COMMITTEE: SOUTHERN RESIDENT KILLER WHALESSFAC Meeting: 7:00 p.m., March 9 at Bass Pro Shops, Tsawwassen Mills, BC

    Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) has proposed measures to aid in the recovery of endangered Southern Resident Killer Whales (SRKW). Public comment on those proposals is open until March 15.

    Details and documents, including the proposal are found on the SFI website here

    You are welcome to attend a special meeting of the Sport Fishing Advisory Committee to learn about the proposal and how measures would effect sport fishing opportunity and recreational boating behaviour around southern Vancouver Island, Georgia Strait and the mouth of the Fraser River. Ed George, Lower Fraser Valley SFAC Chair and BCWF, and Martin Paish, SFAB and Sport Fishing Institute of BC, will provide a presentation on SRKW and the proposed measures. Meeting information sheet

    All welcome to attend, ask questions, comment and provide feedback.

    Until Next time – tight lines

    The SFI Team

    Check out the FishingBC app on IOS and Android!

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  2. wildmanyeah

    wildmanyeah Crew Member

    I remembered to join today thanks to Bmos post!

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    ILHG, Derby and nicnat like this.
  3. Derby

    Derby Crew Member

    April 19, 2018



    TherThere are a few glimmers of warmer weather here and there, enough to have many thinking about the approaching season. However, this year’s fishing plans and opportunities are slow in coming.

    2018 Chinook
    The SFI is currently working closely with the SFAB and DFO to ensure that the 2018 chinook management plan reflects the conservation concerns DFO has for Skeena, Nass, and Fraser River chinook and, at the same time, maintain opportunity and expectation for anglers at sustainable levels.

    Both DFO and the angling community have been challenged by the compressed timelines and lack of data to help inform the process. We are, however, thankful of the efforts of DFO’s South Coast Stock Assessment Division for their work to provide tools and available data for review and consideration. Due to circumstances that could be described as a moving target, achieving appropriate reductions or proposing modifications to fishing plans continues to be challenging.

    It is clear, that among other measures, DFO must invest in appropriate strategies to rebuild stocks of concern. The current situation reinforces the need for DFO to create stability and certainty in the recreational fishery. A return to more timely communication and consultation schedules would be an improvement and would aid in that objective.

    There has been much news about large amounts of funding being dedicated to ocean protection and fisheries management in recent times and of “reinvestment” back into DFO in the Pacific Region. This is encouraging news and will hopefully lead to positive change, enhancement and rebuilding of stocks of concern whether it is Orca, Yelloweye Rockfish or Chinook. But, it is now time to see clear evidence of steps to help fisheries managers and scientists provide sustainable and reliable fisheries for British Columbians.

    We will provide updates regarding decisions and measures as they become available to us. But, in the meantime, we can bring you up to date on some other issues important to our sector.


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    SRKW
    Over the last two months, the SFI participated in a series of meetings with the Sport Fishing Advisory Board (SFAB) and local anglers to gather advice related to proposed closures to provide forage areas for SRKW’s in Juan De Fuca Strait, Georgia Strait and the southern Gulf Islands. Over 400 anglers and concerned citizens attended and offered insights regarding the DFO proposals. The widely held opinion shared and voiced by the community is that a set of areas that limit access to only recreational anglers will not be sufficient to promote the recovery of SRKW’s. Meeting participants urged DFO to ensure that all sectors that have an impact on the whales be asked to make similar sacrifices. And, that unless DFO makes the necessary investments and decisions to improve the overall production of Fraser Chinook and address chinook as prey competition from other predators, the prospects for recovery of SRKW’s is unlikely to change. The SFI agrees with this advice and has provided a submission to the Integrated Harvest Planning Committee (IHPC). We will continue to remain active on this file and work closely with the SFAB. Please visit the SRKW portion of the SFI website for updates and documents on the topic

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  4. Derby

    Derby Crew Member

    Update to Issues
    As mentioned, we’ve updated the Issues section of the SFI website with additional details and a summary of SRKW meetings. But, that is not all, please visit the section of our site for details about Yelloweye Rockfish, Prawns and other issues important to our sector.

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    Catch Counts

    Guide and Lodge Logbook Catch Data Program
    As a continuation of successful work and programs on the West coast Vancouver Island, the SFI and DFO continue to build on the Guide and Lodge Logbook program to improve catch data on the coast. The approach is based on an understanding that guides and lodges can provide valuable information about fish and fisheries not well covered by a diminished creel survey. This is in step with DFO’s Strategic Framework for Catch Monitoring developed a number of years ago.

    Derby Catch Cards
    The SFI is currently engaged in a program with DFO to address concerns raised by anglers regarding the potential for large derbies to inflate effort and catch counts in the areas they take place in. Starting with the Halibut Derby in Juan de Fuca Strait in May, we will be providing catch cards to derby participants. These cards will enable DFO to remove the derby catch and effort from the overall monthly estimates. The SFI will provide randomly awarded prizes for anglers who complete and submit a catch card.

    Derby Card Launch - 22nd Annual Just for the Halibut Derby
    The first derby where catch cards will be in play is the Island Outfitters “Just for the Halibut” derby which takes place April 21 & 22 in the Victoria, Sidney, Sooke and Port Renfrew areas. We offer our sincere thanks to Proline Sports for their generous donation of a complete Okuma Halibut rod & reel combo which will be awarded by a separate draw of submitted catch cards from the derby. Stay tuned for future derbies and great prizes offered for participation.


    CTAG
    The CTAG program continues to grow in number and helps to distinguish professional guides from part time or recreational anglers. As an experienced guide it is to your distinct advantage to acquire your CTAG, not only will you receive a tax credit for the training you’ve had to take on your way to becoming a guide, you are distinctly recognized by insurers and clients will be able to understand a level of experience and a dedication to safety.

    The challenge can be taken at any Service BC office once an application has been accepted by the Industry Training Authority and arrangements are in place. Certified guides will receive a $1,000.00 training credit from the Province and independent operators will save as much as 30% annually on their liability vessel insurance for the designation. Applications are available at the ITA or SFI websites or by request from info@sportfishing.bc.ca.

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    Fishing BC - promoting values and tourism
    Fishing BC, a collaborative marketing effort with the SFI, BC Fishing Resort and Outfitters Association, Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC and Destination BC, is preparing to begin year three. This program, providing opportunity for small communities and businesses to market their sport fishing product to consumers in BC and across borders both south and east, seeks to improve the promotion and awareness of saltwater angling in BC. http://fishingbc.com/

    Watch for campaigns and activities on the website, on facebook and twitter. IF you are interested, as an SFI member and sport fishing service provider or operator in BC, please be in touch with the SFI office and we can provide you with more information and details of promotional opportunities available as a result of the program.


    As always, we at the SFI are interested in hearing from you. If you have any feedback you would like to share, please contact us at info@sportfishing.bc.ca. We are also working on strengthening our Membership Benefits. If you have something to share or offer to our membership, please let us know.

    Until Next time – tight lines

    The SFI Team

    Check out the FishingBC app on IOS and Android

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  5. Derby

    Derby Crew Member

    April 30, 2018
    The spring continues to offer glimpses of great weather and it has also been providing excellent fishing opportunities on what currently appears to be a high abundance of Chinook around the lower mainland and Georgia Strait. Although predictions show cause for concern and we still await decisions regarding Chinook fishing opportunities, perhaps the early season abundance is a sign of things to come and good numbers of chinook will be passing through to the many tributaries in the Fraser River system.

    While many are on the water already there are many more preparing for the season ahead, we would like to share an important campaign of information and action regarding open net pen fish farms. The Sport Fishing Institute of BC is a named supporter of the Wild First campaign. We encourage you to read more about the concerns around open net pen farm impacts to wild salmon and then add your organization and name to the Wild First campaign as well. Please read more below;


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    Wild First is now live and swimming!


    As you know, the provincial and federal governments are hearing loud and clear from British Columbians across the province that our wild Pacific salmon must be protected from the risks posed by open net pen fish farms.

    It appears that both levels of government are close to making the right decision – to remove the farms from our waters and to shift their focus to much cleaner and more sustainable land-based systems. But government needs our help, too.

    There is a need to demonstrate to the provincial and federal governments that when they act to remove the farms, they will have public support.

    Wild salmon need you and your organizations and companies support where possible to stand up and support the Wild First campaign.

    A strong list of Western Canadian leaders is needed to demonstrate to the federal and provincial government that momentum is on the side of conserving and restoring wild salmon and removing open net-pen salmon farms from our waters.

    This campaign is positive and will remain on the high road, respectful of the economic and business concerns of the fish farms, with a focus on showing government a productive cross over from open net pens to closed containment systems on land. A big win awaits; reconciliation with First Nations, a refocus of DFO’s priorities in the Pacific region and the growth of an emerging industry (in a safe and sustainable way) on land.

    Information Gathering
    There is an increasing volume of science on the concerns around open net farming. The SFI will post anticipated and new scientific publications as they are released and have placed an informative document compiled and produced by Tony Allard, Wild Salmon Forever and Good Hope Cannery, on the Fish Farming page in the Issues section of the SFI website.

    While it is important to be knowledgeable about the issue and to familiarize yourself with the concerns, remarks by Lawrence Dill, PhD FRSC, Professor Emeritus, Simon Fraser University, help to summarize the science that exists quite succinctly; “unlike Las Vegas, what happens in the pens doesn’t stay in the pens”. Simply, disease or pathogen transfer within the open net farms is having serious and significant impact on the environment and salmon stocks outside of the pens.

    Those close to this campaign and working for change understand that elected officials (MPS from BC particularly) are asking for a public campaign so it can be can used as additional support and argument in Ottawa.

    Please consider the following actions to support the campaign:

    1. Sign up your organization at Wild First
    2. Sign up personally too;
    3. Share the site with your staff and suppliers and clients; and
    4. Buy shirts at cost to help spread the word!

    As mentioned, more news to share in the coming weeks. In the meantime, please spend a few moments to learn about open net fish farms and to enroll with the Wild First campaign. It isn’t too strong to say that our future access and opportunities to wild salmon are directly linked to what becomes of open net farms on this coast.

    SFI Member Benefits
    As a member, we encourage you to take advantage of the SFI and all of our member benefits. Please feel free to call or write regarding any questions or issues you may encounter related to sport fishing in BC. Our team and board of directors work constantly to advocate on your behalf and to be knowledgeable regarding issues and policies affecting our sector.

    We will be pleased to assist, or direct you appropriately, on issues that may require input from or work with Transport Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Environment Canada and numerous Ministries in the Province.

    Until next time, tight lines,
    The SFI Team
     
  6. wildmanyeah

    wildmanyeah Crew Member

    Derby,

    Why did the SFI decide to back this campaign compared to the various other ones? like this one https://www.safesalmon.ca/ that is supported by BC Federation of Fly Fishers.
     
  7. UkeeDreamin

    UkeeDreamin Well-Known Member

    So disappointed to open the info on “Wild First” and realize it was only about fish farms! So many challenges and issues facing the sustainable management of wild salmon stocks and many of them have far greater and more direct impact than fish farms. Just think of all the freshwater habitat damage that will occur over the next two months as flood season is upon us and largely due to the fact the province continues to allow development in the flood plains of our salmon rivers and streams. Emergency Management BC is set up to reward municipalities who won’t take the appropriate precautions with proper environmental management because they know the province, ie ur tax dollars, will cover the bill if it’s an “emergency”. Of course our earlier and earlier floods are being followed by drier and drier summers and the province refuses to require minimum flows for our salmon resource.

    Anyway, fighting fish farms isn’t a bad cause, it just would be nice to see organizations like PSF pressure the government on some of the bigger issues!

    Cheers!

    Ukee
     
  8. Derby

    Derby Crew Member

    May 30, 2018


    CHINOOK MEASURES ANNOUNCED


    Fisheries and Oceans Canada announced conservation measures for Northern and Southern BC Chinook Salmon and Southern Resident Killer Whales (DFO Fishery Notice linked here) this afternoon. Unfortunately, DFO has dismissed the significant efforts of the recreational community to develop meaningul, measurable plans and have failed to consider the impacts of the restrictions and closures to small communities and businesses along the BC coast.


    Northern Chinook
    The Minister’s May 23rd announcement and the notice today linked Chinook and SRKW issues together. Particularly as it regards to northern chinook fishing opportunities, this is an unfortunate, and completely unnecessary distraction. The issues on the north coast re to do with Skeena and Nass chinook. These runs do not travel much south of the central coast. The Chinook measures announced today for the north coast have nothing to do with SRKW and do not provide a fair or balanced approach to the stakeholders involved. The damage to business and small communities effected by nearly an entire month of a chinook closure in tidal waters and much longer in river will be very significant and long lasting. It is our hope that we will hear additional details from DFO to provide relief to businesses and communities for the damage caused by measures that do not seem to reflect a balanced approach but bowing to political pressure.

    Southern Chinook
    While there has been much discussion about the chinook measures in the south, they fail to acknowledge the tireless efforts of the SFAB to develop a plan that will address conservation needs, while at the same time retain reliable and consistent opportunity for the recreational sector. The work of the SFAB to develop a proposal to meet those needs has, like the consultation regarding SRKW, been disregarded.


    It is clear to see that decisions have been made to appear as though they will make a significant difference to the recovery of SRKW although there is little or no evidence of this. While the recreational community has indicated a willingness to participate in measures that can lead to recovery of Chinook (and SRKW), the measures announced today are much more restrictive than the department itself explained was necessary to satisfy conservation objectives.


    Why did this happen?


    Meanwhile, efforts to actually rebuild Fraser River Chinook populations through habitat restoration, predator control and strategic enhancement have gone no where. Does DFO really believe it can restore these once great runs by “managing” the now tiny exploitation rate associated with recreational fishing? Chinook and all those that depend on them deserve solutions and investment.


    SOUTHERN RESIDENT KILLER WHALE (SRKW) MEASURES ANNOUNCED


    Over the past half year, the SFI has worked actively with the Sport Fishing Advisory Board (SFAB) and Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) to develop sound, science-based approaches to assist the recovery of Southern Resident Killer Whale populations (SRKW). However, rather than utilizing our suggestions and the best scientific information available to implement meaningful and effective measures, DFO has undermined both salmon and halibut fishing by extending the area of finfish closure well beyond what had been put forward in Pacific Region’s consultation documents. The closures, absent of measures to address other factors and without measurable benefit for the whales, seem to be an ill-considered response to pressure from groups that are not interested in scientific facts or meaningful measures to properly aid in the recovery of SRKW.

    In February, Sooke anglers and hundreds of anglers across the South Coast, were given a DFO proposal to protect whales. Not surprisingly, recreational anglers were anxious to do their part to protect this iconic species and more than 400 people attended community meetings to discuss the proposal which indicated that either a finfish closure or a salmon only closure from East Point to Sheringham Point would meet DFO’s requirements to offer a refuge from competition for SRKW for prey as well as from acoustic and physical disturbance.

    Make no mistake: recreational anglers were prepared to do their part.

    The recreational community provided its advice, recommended small adjustments to the boundaries as originally proposed, and indicated its willingness to accept actions that would provide measurable benefit to the whales. This was done with the clear understanding that all others who may or do produce physical and acoustic disturbance would be required to adopt similar measures at the same time.

    However, rather than implement a recommendation based on solutions provided by the consultation processes, Minister LeBlanc has elected to implement a full finfish closure from June 1st to Sept 31st from East Point to Otter Point, an extended area that was never part of DFO’s original proposal.

    It is critical for DFO to fully understand the significant limitations of the benefits to SRKWs and the socio-economic impact to the community of these measures.

    • To our knowledge no socio-economic impact assessment has been attempted.
    • The proposal to include the area from Sheringham Point to Otter Point will produce profound negative social and economic impacts to the adjacent community with minimal if any benefit to the whales.
    • The original proposal to implement salmon only or finfish closure starting at Sheringham Point, was conceived as a means of providing protection to whales from both competition for prey as well as acoustic and physical disturbance. The most recent proposal would provide little to no positive benefit to the whales for protection from physical and acoustic disturbance since no measures to reduce the commercial trap fishery or whale watching pressure have been included.
    • While the area has not hosted a commercial salmon fishery in decades, the closed area supports a large scale commercial crab fishery which we are told will continue.
    • The closed area proposed is a popular spot for the whale watching fleet to “interact” with the whales.
    • There is no scientific evidence to suggest that the presence of recreational fishing vessels impacts the whales ability to acquire prey. DFO research has shown that R Pod routinely and successfully hunts among recreational anglers in Northern BC waters.
    It is impossible for the sport fishing community to understand why DFO chose to ignore the impacts of other marine use groups and instead targeted only the recreational fishery in a greatly expanded area. The sport fishing and southern Vancouver Island community are deeply concerned that these proposed measures may become permanent and that the sport fishery, which has supported Sooke and Port Renfrew for decades, will come to an end. Worse still, there is fear that this closure would provide no measurable benefit to the whales.

    We will continue to urge Minister LeBlanc, and encourage you to send your comments and concerns to DFO and the Minister as well, to undertake the necessary research to fully understand the impacts of all marine activity on SRKWs ability to effectively forage and base management measures on science rather than crass politics.

    Until next time, tight lines,
    The SFI Team


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  9. wildmanyeah

    wildmanyeah Crew Member

    Donate money and Join SFI everyone! these guys are swinging bats! fighting back! lobbying in Ottawa!

    Can't say enough good things about them!!
     
  10. ziggy

    ziggy Well-Known Member

    No mention of Gulf Island closure? Is there more?
     
  11. Derby

    Derby Crew Member

    June 21, 2018


    The 2018 season is upon us. Whether off Vancouver, the central coast, the north end or west coast of the island, north coast or Haida Gwaii, many are out on the water and reports of a good start to a summer of fishing are coming in.


    While it is getting busy and there are many distractions we thought we'd provide a few brief update details from the SFI team;



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    WILD FIRST, FISH FARMS AND THE PROVINCE


    In a recent update, we encouraged you to look at and enroll in the Wild First campaign. If you have not had a look please do so. The provincial and federal governments must continue to hear from British Columbians that our Pacific salmon must be protected from the risks posed by open net pen fish farms.

    It seems evident that a combination of factors are beginning to change the tide on the conversation. While it would be better if the timelines were accelerated and details of operational change requirements better explained, it is encouraging to see the Province make an an announcement yesterday that was specifically designed to address fish farm issues and will press DFO and include First Nations to increased involvement and to make decisions. See the announcement here: B.C. government announces new approach to salmon farm tenures


    The constant aim is to have both levels of government move towards the right decision – to remove the open net pen farms from our waters and to shift their focus to much cleaner and more sustainable closed containment systems.

    While progress is being made, there is an ongoing need to demonstrate to the provincial and federal governments that when they act to adapt the farms, they will have public support.

    The Wild First campaign is positive and will remain on the high road, respectful of the economic and business concerns of the fish farms, with a focus on showing government a productive cross over from open net pens to closed containment systems. A big win awaits; reconciliation with First Nations, a refocus of DFO’s priorities in the Pacific region and the growth of an emerging industry (in a safe and sustainable way).

    Information Gathering
    There is an increasing volume of science on the concerns around open net farming. The SFI will post anticipated and new scientific publications as they are released and have placed an informative document compiled and produced by Tony Allard, Wild Salmon Forever and Good Hope Cannery, on the Fish Farming page in the Issues section of the SFI website.

    Please consider the following actions to support the campaign:

    1. Sign up your organization and personally at Wild First
    3. Share the site with your staff, suppliers, clients and friends; and
    4. Buy shirts at cost to help spread the word!

    Please spend a few moments to learn about open net fish farms and to enroll with the Wild First campaign. It isn’t too strong to say that our future access and opportunities to salmon are directly linked to what becomes of open net farms on this coast.


    SALMON TALK LEADING TO ACTION - WILD SALMON ADVISORY COUNCIL


    And, regarding salmon and the need to keep the conversation going, we are pleased to share details and congratulate the SFI's Martin Paish on his recent appointment to the Wild Salmon Advisory Council created by the Province of BC. Although salmon are managed by the Federal Government, discussion and attention to all the factors that effect salmon in our Province by our Provincial government is a good and positive step. We hope the creation of this Council will foster more attention and change to environmental and terrestrial impacts that effect salmon fisheries, their management and opportunities to enhance or rehabilitate runs or systems. We look forward to hearing more from this new Council. Read the announcement from the Province here: Wild salmon protection driving newly appointed Wild Salmon Advisory Council


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    GUIDE AND LODGE LOG BOOKS


    June marked the start of data collection for the 2018 Guide and Lodge Log Book Program. After many trial years, DFO is now working to deploy a mandatory log book program to all guides and lodges on the coast. The collection of data is increasingly important and it is clear that the lodge and guide component of the sector are knowledgeable, encounter a high proportion of the recreational catch in certain areas and can contribute valuable information to DFO. Recognizing the value and importance of this, the SFI continues to work in collaboration with DFO to provide training, materials and in season support to participants.


    Based on feedback and advice the SFI has received from guides, we have worked with DFO stock assessment staff to produce a log book page that is quicker and easier to complete and allows location to be identified by familiar location names rather than by numbered management area designation. Early feedback from guides who are using the new page seems to confirm that the new page is easier to work with.


    Click on the link here for a sample guide log book page and an idea of the information collected.

    By sharing the responsibility for proving the case for a sustainable and responsible fishery, guides are doing their part to provide increased opportunity for all anglers.


    Contact the SFI with questions or to obtain a log book or sampling materials.


    CHINOOK STOMACH CONTENTS PROJECT


    Related to learning more about recreational catch and feeding habits, we share details of a project currently being conducted by Will Diguid, PhD Student, University of Victoria, and his research colleagues. Complete details are found here but the short version is that Will and his team would like to receive Chinook salmon stomachs from your catch. The aim is to learn more about Chinook diets in Southern BC and compare contemporary summer diets to those documented in historical studies. The methods to assess the contents isn't too appetizing but you do not have to worry about that! Will is looking for participants to contribute from Southern BC waters. If interested please contact Will at willduguid@hotmail.com





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  12. Derby

    Derby Crew Member

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    SOUTHERN RESIDENT KILLER WHALE (SRKW) MEASURES



    We will not revisit the recent DFO announcements in detail but it does seem relevant to provide some reminders about the inconsistencies and implications. The politically motivated, rather than science based, decisions are having significant impact to the recreational fishing community yet will provide minimal if any benefit to the whales. This is especially troubling because it is the recreational angling community who is more committed than any other sector to participating in meaningful and effective measures to aid SRKW.

    It is critical that DFO fully understand and acknowledge the significant limitations of the benefits to SRKWs and the socio-economic impact of these recent measures

    • The measure that added the area from Sheringham Point to Otter Point to the full finfish closure produces significant negative social and economic impacts to the adjacent community with minimal if any benefit to the whales.
    • The original proposal to implement salmon only or a finfish closure starting at Sheringham Point, was conceived as a means of providing protection to whales from both competition for prey as well as acoustic and physical disturbance. The measures as implemented provide little to no positive benefit to the whales for protection from physical and acoustic disturbance since no measures to reduce other activity or whale watching pressure have been included.
    • There is no scientific evidence to suggest that the presence of recreational fishing vessels impacts the whales ability to acquire prey. DFO research has shown that R Pod routinely and successfully hunts among recreational anglers in Northern BC waters.
    It remains unclear and indefensible why DFO chose to ignore significant consultation and feedback provided and the impacts of other marine use groups. The sport fishing community is deeply concerned that these measures may become permanent or even expanded and that the sport fishery, which increasingly supports many small coastal communities, will come to an end. Worse still, there is fear and a strong belief that the closures will provide no measurable benefit to the whales.

    We will continue to urge Minister LeBlanc, and encourage you to send your comments and concerns to DFO and the Minister as well, to undertake the necessary research to fully understand the impacts of all marine activity on SRKWs ability to effectively forage and base management measures on science rather than any other pressures.


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    YELLOWEYE ROCKFISH AND DESCENDING DEVICES



    Yelloweye Rockfish is Species at Risk along our coastline. They are not a target fish but many anglers encounter Yelloweye (and other rockfish) while fishing for other species. As a reminder, when caught and brought rapidly to the surface rockfish suffer from Barotrauma. This is the life threatening condition, referred to as the "bends" in deep water scuba divers, which causes nitrogen bubbles to form in the blood stream and tissue. In rockfish it causes eyes to bulge and stomachs to be forced inside out and unless the fish are returned to a similar depth from which they were captured they will die.

    What can you do to help? There are a few things that you can do to help Yelloweye and other rockfish you may encounter but do not intend to or cannot retain. There is scientific evidence that shows that if a rockfish is returned to a similar depth to which it was caught within 5 minutes of reaching the surface, they have an excellent chance of survival.

    As, the poster above indicates, take steps to avoid Yelloweye habitat when fishing for other species, ensure you know how to properly identify the species, acquire and be prepared to use a descending device to get an incidentally caught Yelloweye (or any rockfish) you don't plan to keep back to depth as soon as possible and make sure, when asked, to report your catch as accurately as possible.

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    2018 POLICY CONFERENCE & BIG SPLASH GALA FUNDRAISER - SAVE THE DATE!


    We have set the date for the 2018 Big Splash Gala Fundraiser and Industry Policy Conference. We will, once again, hold events in downtown Vancouver at the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver. Please mark Thursday,November 22nd on your calendars. We know it’s early, but it’s never too early to save the date. Much more information to follow.

    SFI MEMBER BENEFITS


    As a member, we encourage you to take advantage of the SFI and its member benefits. Please feel free to call or write regarding any questions or issues you may encounter related to sport fishing in BC. Our team and board of directors work constantly to advocate on your behalf and to be knowledgeable regarding issues and policies affecting our sector.

    We will be pleased to assist, or direct you appropriately, on issues that may require input from or work with Transport Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Environment Canada and numerous Ministries in the Province.


    Until next time, tight lines,
    The SFI Team
     
    Peahead likes this.
  13. Derby

    Derby Crew Member

    July 5, 2018


    We hope you celebrated our nation's birthday by getting out and wetting a line. The season is well underway and there are many spots along our coast that are reporting excellent fishing.


    While it is busy and there are many distractions, we thought we'd provide a few brief update details on issues raised during this season so far;



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    WHILE YOU WERE OUT ON THE WATER...

    RESIDENT KILLER WHALES CRITICAL HABITAT DISCUSSION - OPPORTUNITY TO COMMENT THIS FALL


    As we are all familiar, DFO has been taking steps to implement fishery management actions to support increased chinook prey availability in key Southern Resident Killer Whale foraging areas. Work, study, and consultation continues and now includes consideration of Northern Resident Killer Whale habitat.


    DFO opened a review of the Recovery Strategies to public consultation on June 12, 2018 and closing on July 11, 2018. While the key points for discussion require input from stakeholders, the timing and the window of opportunity to provide feedback is entirely inappropriate. Stakeholders that could provide meaningful feedback are either unaware of this comment period or are too busy with the height of the season. Many have pointed this out to DFO, and we encourage you to weigh in on the poor timing too if you have a moment. It is important to note though that there will be opportunity in the fall to provide feedback to the processes underway.


    Details of this current period of consultation is found on the DFO site here. And, we have listed links to the information on the SFI RKW Issues section.


    The key points for discussion are as follows:

    • The draft Amended Recovery Strategy updates the critical habitat for Northern and Southern Resident Killer Whales based on new science advice
    • Two additional areas of special importance as proposed critical habitat for Resident Killer Whales. These include:
      • waters on the continental shelf off southwestern Vancouver Island, including Swiftsure and La Pérouse Banks (important for both Northern and Southern Resident Killer Whales)
      • waters of west Dixon Entrance, along the north coast of Graham Island from Langara to Rose Spit (important for Northern Resident Killer Whales)
    • The amendment also provides clarification of the functions, features and attributes for all critical habitat identified for Northern and Southern Resident Killer Whales
    Note that these are proposals to identify critical habitat for both NRKW and SRKW. The activities that may or not be allowed in those areas have not been determined. If you operate or fish in areas where you know Northern or Southern RKW frequent, it is important to contribute your feedback and should plan to do so in the fall.


    We will be watching this process as it unfolds and will report out to you as information becomes available.


    We’ll expect to contribute and provide feedback in the fall when there is a realistic opportunity to connect with stakeholders and to consult with DFO about areas being considered for Northern and Southern Killer Whale critical habitat.


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    GUIDE AND LODGE LOG BOOKS


    June marked the start of data collection for the 2018 Guide and Lodge Log Book Program. After many trial years, DFO is now working to deploy a mandatory log book program to all guides and lodges on the coast. The collection of data is increasingly important and it is clear that the lodge and guide component of the sector are knowledgeable, encounter a high proportion of the recreational catch in certain areas and can contribute valuable information to DFO. Recognizing the value and importance of this, the SFI continues to work in collaboration with DFO to provide training, materials and in season support to participants.


    Based on feedback and advice the SFI has received from guides, we have worked with DFO stock assessment staff to produce a log book page that is quicker and easier to complete and allows location to be identified by familiar location names rather than by numbered management area designation. Early feedback from guides who are using the new page seems to confirm that the new page is easier to work with.


    Click on the link here for a sample guide log book page and an idea of the information collected.

    By sharing the responsibility for proving the case for a sustainable and responsible fishery, guides are doing their part to provide increased opportunity for all anglers.


    Contact the SFI with questions or to obtain a log book or sampling materials.




    [​IMG]

    DESCENDING DEVICES


    You have seen this before but we will continue to remind and encourage use of descending devices (for the foreseeable future or until it is clear that all involved in BC sport fishing are aware of the devices).


    Yelloweye Rockfish have been defined as a species at risk along our coastline. They are not a target fish but many anglers encounter Yelloweye (and other rockfish) while fishing for other species. As a reminder, when caught and brought rapidly to the surface rockfish suffer from Barotrauma. This is the life threatening condition, referred to as the "bends" in deep water scuba divers, which causes nitrogen bubbles to form in the blood stream and tissue. In rockfish it causes eyes to bulge and stomachs to be forced inside out and unless the fish are returned to a similar depth from which they were captured they will die.

    What can you do to help? There are a few things that you can do to help Yelloweye and other rockfish you may encounter but do not intend to or cannot retain. There is scientific evidence that shows that if a rockfish is returned to a similar depth to which it was caught within 5 minutes of reaching the surface, they have an excellent chance of survival.

    As, the poster above indicates, take steps to avoid Yelloweye habitat when fishing for other species, ensure you know how to properly identify the species, acquire and be prepared to use a descending device to get an incidentally caught Yelloweye (or any rockfish) you don't plan to keep back to depth as soon as possible and make sure, when asked, to report your catch as accurately as possible including the use of a descending device.



    Until next time, tight lines,
    The SFI Team
     
  14. Derby

    Derby Crew Member

    August 1, 2018


    For many, August represents the peak salmon fishing month in BC tidal waters and from reports we are hearing around the coast, it looks like it’ll live up to that reputation once again in 2018. As usual, fishing is all about location and timing, this spring and summer have produced some excellent opportunities for those who are fortunate enough to be at the right place at the right time. Contrary to DFO predictions, both chinook and coho fishing has been strong in many areas for a big part of the early season, and as we now enter mid to late summer most stocks of concern have left the fishing grounds and regulations allow for maximum opportunity. We hope you are all enjoying a successful season thus far and are even able to head out and enjoy catching a few yourselves!


    SOUTH COAST SOCKEYE - AUGUST 1st
    Sockeye will be opening for recreational anglers in most areas of the south coast starting August 1st with full bag limits of 4 per day and 8 in possession. This is great news for anglers in this region as reports of significant abundance in the marine areas are starting to come through.

    From a recent DFO fisheries notice: Retention of sockeye in marine recreational fisheries is scheduled to begin on August 1. The details will be identified in a separate Fisheries Notice. In-river recreational fisheries are likely to begin next week with dates and times to be determined following the next Panel meeting. Link to the July 31st notice: DFO Fishery Notice

    Its been a few years since we’ve had a sockeye fishery so here’s hoping that anglers get out to enjoy a day on the water with a good chance of success.


    NORTH COAST SOCKEYE - SKEENA AND BABINE RIVERS
    After an extremely difficult start to the season, it appears that anglers may get some much needed relief in the form of a sockeye opening on the Skeena river starting the week of August 6th or possibly earlier for the Babine. DFO’s North Area Coast Director, Colin Masson, provided some remarks and details to CFTK Terrace on Monday

    We are hopeful that this opportunity, combined with one of the highest Tyee test fishery steelhead indices in the past decade, will attract more anglers to the region and at least partly mitigate some of the damage caused by wide spread closures in June and July.

    As we all know, this is one of the most productive and beautiful river fisheries in the Province so if you were ever planning a trip then perhaps this might the year to do it!


    RESIDENT KILLER WHALES - CRITICAL HABITAT NORTH AND SOUTH
    The potential to extend the range of critical habitat for Southern Resident Killer Whales to include a large portion of the WCVI extending from roughly Tofino to Port Renfrew has created considerable concern for local coastal communities and businesses that depend on tourism and angling to generate economic activity in those communities. Your SFI team has been working closely with both DFO and Environment Canada staff to help them understand the importance of well timed, respectful and thorough local consultation before any decisions are made. The vast amount of traditional local knowledge that can be brought to the table needs to be both heard and carefully considered in order to find the best solutions for both the whales and the people who share their environment with them. We will continue to work hard to make sure that the right amount of peer reviewed, conclusive evidence is both obtained and then used to create a recovery plan that is science based with the ability to produce measurable results. Both the local communities and the whales deserve more than the political window dressing we’ve witnessed in other areas.


    [​IMG]
    GUIDE AND LODGE CATCH LOG BOOK PROGRAM
    We’d like to offer our sincere thanks to all of the guides and lodges who have either begun or continued to participate in the Guide log book and e-log program. Both participation rates and consistency of reporting are way up this year. We’d be remiss not to mention that the completion of a log book is now required under section 61 of the BC Sport Fishing regulations so if you don’t have a log book please get in touch with us and we’ll get you set up. We know we are now entering “crunch time” for the fishing season, so if you require any additional support, please don’t hesitate to contact Martin Paish and we’ll do what we can to help.

    Click on the link here for a sample guide log book page and an idea of the information collected.

    GOOD FISHING? BE CAREFUL WITH THOSE RELEASES!
    With reports of abundant “shakers” in many areas of the coast, we’d like to remind anglers that these smaller fish represent next years keepers so should be treated like the precious gems they are. Please remember to pinch down barbs, keep the fish wet if at all possible, and NEVER “shake” a small fish off your hooks. Same thing with larger fish. Take a little time to be prepared before you decide you’d like a picture of any fish you plan to release. Treat each fish as quickly and as carefully as possible, far better to see the fish swim away strongly after capturing a quick picture then to handle the fish for too long or clumsily and harm it.

    Ditto for rockfish. Please help reduce the mortality of released rockfish by using a descending device to get that fish back down to depth quickly. The increase in survival is incredible with these devices so do your part for your kids and grand kids by taking care now to ensure they survive! For a quick demonstration of how a descending works please see this short clip recently produced by Reel West Coast.


    2018 POLICY CONFERENCE & BIG SPLASH GALA FUNDRAISER – MARK CALENDARS, TELL FRIENDS!

    And, a reminder to note the 2018 Big Splash Gala Fundraiser and Industry Policy Conference, to be held on Thursday, November 22, on your calendar. The Splash and Conference will be downtown Vancouver at the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver. More details to follow.


    Until next time, tight lines,
    The SFI Team
     
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  15. Derby

    Derby Crew Member

  16. Derby

    Derby Crew Member

    September 28, 2018

    [​IMG]


    SRKW.ORG

    BC's SOUTHERN RESIDENT KILLER WHALES ARE ENDANGERED
    SO IS THE TRUTH ABOUT THE REASONS WHY



    Over the past few decades BC’s Southern Resident Killer Whale population has seen periods of both growth and decline.

    But now, ill-informed and unscrupulous political groups are exploiting public concern about our killer whales to push a devastating agenda and make scapegoats of BC’s coastal communities.

    In a cynical effort to push their political agenda, a well-funded lawsuit and media campaign are targeting recreational sport fishing and threatening to close the Chinook fishery across vast areas of BC’s coast.

    Stopping sport fishing will not aid our killer whales.

    Instead it will devastate BC families, BC’s coastal communities, and BC’s economy.

    Sport fishing is a vital part of our history, heritage, and economy.

    Stopping sport fishing would be an economic and political disaster.

    BC’s recreational sport fishing community cares deeply about our entire ecosystem. No one has a greater interest or serves a larger role in protecting, preserving and enhancing BC’s marine life.

    To help protect our sport and our coastal communities the SFI has created a new, informational website to fully explain this issue - SRKW.ORG

    We encourage you to learn more about the real problem, and the real solution, by visiting SRKW.org and by sharing this information with others, including your local political representatives.

    Together we can help enhance both our killer whale and Chinook populations.

    [​IMG]


    RESIDENT KILLER WHALES CRITICAL HABITAT DISCUSSION - OCTOBER 3 AND 4
    INFORMATION SESSIONS AND OPPORTUNITY TO COMMENT


    DFO opened a review of the Recovery Strategies to public consultation on June 12, 2018 and closed it on July 11, 2018. While the key points for discussion required input from stakeholders, the timing and the window of opportunity to provide feedback was inappropriate. Stakeholders that could provide meaningful feedback were either unaware of this comment period or were too busy with the height of the season. Many pointed this out to DFO, and while they have maintained a time line of action, they have added two in person opportunities to provide comment about the critical habitat proposals for Southern Resident Killer Whales on the West coast of Vancouver Island.

    The following are details of the notice from DFO:

    Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) and the Parks Canada Agency (PCA) are pleased to notify you of the following information sessions regarding the proposed amendments to the Recovery Strategy for the Northern and Southern Resident Killer Whales (Orcinus orca) in Canada.

    The amended Recovery Strategy includes identification of two additional areas as proposed critical habitat for Resident Killer Whales following recent science advice, as well as clarification of the features, functions and attributes for proposed and existing critical habitat. The proposed amended Recovery Strategy is currently posted on the Species at Risk Public Registry, and public input is being sought on Section 7 (Critical habitat) of the document for a 60-day comment period (September 4 – November 3, 2018). Input is sought via the above link or through the regional SARA program (contact info below).

    The purpose of the information sessions is to provide information about the proposed critical habitat for Northern and Southern Resident Killer Whales, including the description of the science advice underlying the identification of the additional proposed critical habitat areas, and to answer questions about the proposed amendments to the document.

    Locations, dates and times of these meetings are:

    Regional in-person meetings:
    PORT ALBERNI
    Wednesday, October 3rd, 2018, 6-9 pm
    Best Western Barclay Hotel, 4277 Stamp Ave.

    UCLUELET
    Thursday, October 4th, 2018, 6-9 pm
    Black Rock Oceanfront Resort, Ballroom, 596 Marine Drive
     
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  17. Derby

    Derby Crew Member

    ADDITIONAL BACKGROUND ON THE RKW ISSUE AND SUGGESTIONS FOR DEVELOPING A RESPONSE
    This issue is a challenge in that it has become a media focus yet there is not a lot of understanding or public sympathy in terms of protecting recreational fishing opportunity vs. what is perceived as "protecting" SRKW's. Incomplete science and the potential of devastating impacts to coastal communities make it critically important that DFO slows down and makes sure all information is acquired before making decisions.

    We are now in a 60-day written consultation period for the proposal Critical Habitat extension. The deadline for submissions is November 3rd. It is important that we all take time to get it right rather than providing a knee jerk response. And, just because there may be public meetings doesn’t mean anglers shouldn’t take time to provide a written response. It is of the utmost importance that everyone you know who is concerned or likely to be impacted responds to that proposal. This is worth repeating: You’ve got until November 3rd to create a written response – do the homework, understand the issue and provide a reasoned, but passionate response that includes your local expertise and traditional knowledge.

    As mentioned, The SFI has an RKW page where a variety of articles and documents are listed including a link to the SAR Public Registry, where responses must be submitted.

    SAR Public Registry - Comments can be sent via email at the bottom of the page.

    Please take the time to read all the documents associated with the issue especially the following, posted here and on the SFI website:

    Research Document 2017/035 - Habitats of Special Importance to Resident Killer Whales (Orcinus orca) off the West Coast of Canada

    It is important to understand a few key points in responding:

    • This consultation is about the critical habitat extension. It is not about closures. DFO has said nothing about what it may or may not do in the area once it is designated as critical habitat.
    • It appears that DFO is committed to designating this area as critical habitat. The opportunity to comment and participate in the upcoming sessions, should allow for a challenge to some of the data, especially in terms of the frequency of observations in the La Perouse Bank and Swifttsure Bank areas.
    • Local traditional knowledge needs to be a part of consideration, therefore the importance of locals and those familiar with the area providing comment. There are guides in the area who have spent decades on the offshore banks for most of each summer. How frequently do you see killer whales?
    • Make sure that when you respond that you carefully articulate your local knowledge and experience on the water as well as how this issue is likely to impact your business, family and life. Are rumours of closures impacting repeat bookings? Is the uncertainty about the future causing you difficulty in planning your business activities moving ahead?
    • The response doesn’t need to be an article that will pass scientific peer review. Please avoid exaggeration and assumptions, one page stating concerns will suffice.
    A next step in the process will be how DFO determines what activities can take place within the Critical Habitat areas, if they are legally added.

    • It isn't clear what this will look like or when it will happen. Depending on the sense of urgency DFO applies to the situation, worst-case scenario may be that fisheries measures are imposed in time for the 2019 season. We currently have no confirmation or denial of that schedule despite asking. As you may have seen, environmental non-government organizations (ENGO) have stated their desire to see all fisheries closed and recently launched a lawsuit to pressure DFO. The response from DFO is worth noting and a little encouraging, linked here and on the SFI website: Minister fires back at groups for suing over Killer Whales - September 9, 2018.
     
  18. Derby

    Derby Crew Member

    Key points to consider:

    • Despite the “crisis mode” that has been created by a well funded ENGO social media and mainstream media campaign, the facts indicate that while many Killer Whale populations are healthy, if not thriving, SRKW’s face a 0 to 50% chance of extinction in the next 100 years. This, by anyone’s definition, is not an immediate crisis. DFO and society have the time to determine some meaningful, measurable steps to aid the whales rather than rush in, panicking about a falsely identified time crisis, and get it wrong or worse, get it wrong and negatively impact the health and stability of coastal communities, businesses and individuals.
    • Our “consultation” experience for SRKW’s in 2018 created great mistrust between DFO and the fishing community. The DFO Minister of the day chose to bow to political pressure in the form of a threatened lawsuit rather than listen to the advice offered by his own Pacific Region staff and the carefully and thoughtfully gathered community recommendations that incorporated the best available science of the day. This was both demoralizing to staff, insulting to those who took the time to participate in consultation, and downright irresponsible in its purely political rather than scientific justification. The result was a ridiculous farce that permits industrial scale commercial fisheries for the same species in the same areas while low impact recreational fisheries are prohibited. We know that regional staff and the local fishing community are both insulted and demoralized by the outcome, and we are fearful that a similar approach may be taken this time. However, we are hopeful that the new Minister, who has consistently declared that best science will be his guide and is from the west coast, may take the time to understand the issue more clearly and respond in a more meaningful and science-based manner. His response to the Sept 6th lawsuit, as noted above, launched by 6 so-called conservation groups, gives some cause for optimism in this regard and perhaps evidence that reason and science will prevail over Twitter, Facebook and emotion.
    • Little is known about populations of SRKW prior to the 60’s. There were 47 animals captured in the 60’s and 70’s and removed from the population. Since then, the numbers of SRKW has fluctuated between a low of 66 in 1973 to a high of 98 in 1995. Since 2001 the population has fluctuated between 89 and its current level of 74 individuals. The increases in the population correlate well with times of high chinook abundance and in the presence of much, much larger commercial fisheries than we have today. Much of that abundance was hatchery origin chinook yet many of those hatcheries, especially on the Fraser River, no longer operate today or operate at much lower production levels.
    • The actual locations and timing of foraging behaviour in the proposed critical habitat extension do not appear even remotely conclusive – especially in the portions of the proposed Critical Habitat zone around La Perouse and Swiftsure Banks. DFO needs to be certain about where and when these animals forage, and what benefits (or lack thereof) SRKW’s will get from fishery management measures. An understanding of these details needs to be gathered and be more definitive before throwing the citizens of the WCVI under the bus as a political gesture to a vocal ENGO community that seems to just not care about the impacts that half baked, panic driven measures will have on the families and communities of the region.
    • A technical workshop held in Vancouver last year was well attended by both whale and salmon biologists and managers from OR, WA, AK and BC. The SFI's Martin Paish attended as a representative of the SFAB, SFI and the sport fishing community. The consensus reached at that workshop was that large-scale closures implemented to increase the overall abundance of chinook would NOT be an effective strategy to provide more prey to SRKW’s. Again, DFO needs to listen to its experts and not to strategically manipulated public opinion. Find details and findings of the workshop here and on the SFI website: SRKW Prey Workshop Proceedings
    • DFO has a responsibility and fiduciary duty to consider not only the whales but the people and communities that will be impacted by any potential management measures. Widespread closures in key fishing areas such as those that have occurred in the more eastern areas of the proposed Critical Habitat will produce significant negative impacts to individuals, businesses, families and entire communities and likely without accomplishing anything that may provide material benefits to the whales.
    FOR THE WHALES AND BRITISH COLUMBIANS

    • DFO will have one opportunity to get this right as widespread fishing closures will force the closure of businesses, the removal of fishing related infrastructure and the loss of market share to other areas. “Shooting first and asking questions later” by imposing widespread management measures as proposed by the ENGO community is irresponsible to both the impacted communities and the whales. Such action poses the real risk of providing the optics that much has been accomplished for the whales while not providing any real solution. The designation of the closed areas in the Salish Sea in 2018 fall in to that category.
    • There are solutions available that will actually solve problems rather than address symptoms.We believe that if government is willing to make the right investments, chinook abundance can be enhanced and restored to allow for both fisheries and abundant prey for RKW’s. The focus should be on producing more chinook rather than catching less. The 80’s and 90’s produced abundances of chinook that provided for large scale commercial fisheries, a growing recreational fishery and an increasing RKW population. How do we get back there?
    To protect both citizens of the BC coast and recover whales, government (both Provincial and Federal) needs to:

    1. Invest in strategic enhancement of the right stocks of chinook that will provide prey that is accessible to RKW’s when they need it. Modernize hatchery protocols to focus on the right stocks in terms of survival success and timing.
    2. Invest in understanding and then mitigating the impacts of predators on both juvenile and adult salmon.
    3. Invest in protecting remaining salmonid habitat first, and then rehabilitating damaged habitat as a more long-term strategy. Habitat must include sufficient water flows to allow salmon to both spawn and rear.
    We have had situations in the past where both whales and fisheries coexisted well and examples in the north where that situation continues. We believe that this is not an us or them scenario. Action and response are required but it must be multifaceted. Both public and politicians must better understand that harvest of chinook and access to our coast is critical to both the whales and small coastal communities on the WCVI. And, that modifying harvest is at best addressing a symptom, not a solution. Reducing or eliminating chinook harvest in particular areas displaces harvest somewhere else and does not address the underlying issues including those described above; reduced production of chinook, degraded habitat and predator control.

    Simply put, in order to actually solve the problem we need to do many things including make more chinook.

    We need a sustained and unified voice to demand that the necessary investments are in place to address the real issues that will deliver meaningful, measurable change. We are Canadians. We care about our citizens, our environment and our whales and don’t run our society based on tweets and manipulative social media campaigns.

    Let’s take the time to get this right and do our best to aid RKW’s and the lifestyle and economy that is so important to the west coast of our country.



    Until next time, tight lines,
    The SFI Team
     
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  19. GLG

    GLG Well-Known Member

    There is an old saying with trial lawyers it goes something like this.

    If you have the facts, pound the facts.
    If you have the law, pound the law.
    If you have neither pound the table.

    Fellas, your starting with pound the table with your conspiracy theroy when you really don't need to.

    Headline in the paper ..... Anglers take on big whale conspiracy.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2018
  20. ziggy

    ziggy Well-Known Member

    You’re probably viewing this as someone who knows the facts or at least has attempted to learn them. Sadly the battle in the media is for people who can’t be bothered educating themselves on the issue and mostly rely on sound bites and headlines to form opinion. The campaign by the ENGO’s is totally based on giving select information and embellishing other bits in order to work the emotional side of the audience,as opposed to their intellectual side. I’m sure you’ll agree, much of their propaganda has maybe a little fact to it and a lot of spin? I notice on here there has been numerous exchanges on the topic here about what is or isn’t fact. I don’t see the same level of exchange on the ENGO sites. On there the proclamation comes down from above and the sheeple fall in line. Often they won’t even have a forum on their sites,so as not to have to defend their position. They simply state what they believe to be true and expect their followers to get onboard. The ENGO’s have become masters of misleading information. Their followers follow them like a congregation of religious faithful , as they become more faith based they often become far less fact based. I personally don’t believe the ENGO’s have a conspiracy going. I do believe that their funding and therefore their pay cheque’s,depend on finding an issue that they can sell to the public and in sales the real truth is often the victim.

    I like your analogy and would argue it pretty much captures the ENGO campaign where louder is righter lol
     

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