How do you drop your traps?

Discussion in 'Saltwater Fishing Forum' started by Rain City, Nov 3, 2019.

  1. Rain City

    Rain City Crew Member

    So I dropped my new prawn traps yesterday and much to my dismay they ALL landed upside down (mud on the top when I pulled them up). The 12lb traps are heavier on the bottom and are supposed to right themselves as they sink. So what I normally do is try and drop against the current staying in gear as I let line out. This particular setup I have a 10lb flat weight clipped 30' past the last trap towards the buoy. What I try and do is give the rope a long tug once the gear has fallen a ways to make sure I spread the gear out. These new traps have an offset top rope to allegedly make them easier to pull up, to trap the prawns against one side and to allow the traps to lay flat as you drop your gear. I'm told by more than one person that the traps being upside down isn't a big deal but when I read up on it more the tunnels are supposed to be high up so the prawns can't just walk out (made sense to me). On my traps they are 100% at the "top" of the trap. So with all those variables in mind what the hell is making my traps flip upside down?

    -current direction?
    -10lb weight too big or unnecessary?
    -need more weight in traps?
    -dont pull on the gear when setting?
    -let the gear down slowly?

    Let the debate begin I guess.
     
  2. Fishboy89

    Fishboy89 Member

    Mud is always bad when prawning.....never a good sign. Maybe they are dragging when you pull them up and it looks like they landed upside down? Not familiar with the offset rope set up.
     
    Rain City likes this.
  3. Rain City

    Rain City Crew Member

    Thanks for the reply. I was always told this as well but this area, which usually produces well, is most certainly a mud bottom. Apparently being "near" rocks is all that matters.
     
  4. Gong Show

    Gong Show Well-Known Member

    I try and get the spread between the traps right for the first third of the line, then zig zag over the area. No pulling if I think the gear is near the bottom.
    As for current, if it is moving, you set into it, you release your scotchman and it will travel back over top the traps.
     
    Rain City likes this.
  5. Maybe the 10 lb weight is too heavy and it is going down far faster than the traps causing them to land upside down?
     
    CRGreg and Rain City like this.
  6. Rain City

    Rain City Crew Member

    My thought as well
     
  7. Slabbedout

    Slabbedout Member

    Sounds to me like your in line 10lb could be sinking quicker than the traps and pulling them by the bridle upside down to the bottom ?

    I weight each trap and then tie a knot in the line roughly 20’ from the last trap, I set my traps and once I feel them land I then clip on a weight on a carabiner and let this slide down until It hits the knot. Works great every time you just need to plan and set against the current so your traps are landing on the spot and not behind it
     
    Prfisher and Rain City like this.
  8. Slabbedout

    Slabbedout Member

    Others must have posted while I was typing my response
     
    porlier pass likes this.
  9. Rain City

    Rain City Crew Member

    I tried the slide down weight thing once and the line twisted and pulled my buoy down. Was using a small buoy then. Been scared to do it since.
     
  10. Slabbedout

    Slabbedout Member

    You have to hold on and feel the weight slide down and hit the knot

    If you just throw everything over it will end up a twisted disaster. And if someone pulls your gear and throws it back out it it will be a huge mess
     
    Rain City likes this.
  11. Revenge

    Revenge Well-Known Member

    I have a buddy that only fishes his traps small side down and swears thats the best way.
    He gets loads of prawns so it does work .
    He had them custom made with spikes welded to a cross bar to punch holes in the cat food cans
    Works pretty slick
     
    Rain City likes this.
  12. Rain City

    Rain City Crew Member

    Huh. Sounds cool. I think some traps the doors are more centered then it wouldn't matter. I guess if they can get in and they have a reason to stick around they will. Some of the areas around Vancouver see lots of rec pressure and your presentation needs to shine.
     
  13. Revenge

    Revenge Well-Known Member

    The holes on his traps are closest to the small end (in his case bottom)of the trap. His theory is ,the prawns can find the holes easier ?
    Seem to work but id like to run them both ways on the same lines to test the theory .
     
  14. Rain City

    Rain City Crew Member

    I wonder if he's saying it's "his method" by default lol. Perhaps he had the same issues I'm having. ;)
     
    Gong Show likes this.
  15. Dan The Man

    Dan The Man Active Member

    15lbs anchor - 30ft clip on trap ,another 20 ft clip on trap. 20-30 ft clip on 10lbs weight ... once u drop of last anchor give it a pull. Always set with the wind, and moving . Thats how i was thought and it works!
     
    chipstealer and Rain City like this.
  16. Capt_Ed

    Capt_Ed Crew Member

    I thread gillnet lead line around the the bottom ring of my traps and never have an issue
     
  17. Capt_Ed

    Capt_Ed Crew Member

    I thread gillnet lead line around the the bottom ring of my traps and never have an issue
     
  18. Rain City

    Rain City Crew Member

    Gillnet line? Is that just like a thick leaded line?
     
  19. triplenickel

    triplenickel Well-Known Member

    I run 18" square mesh not the round ones, I have a run of 3/8" chain zip-tied around all 4 sides on the inside. Then a 10lb cannonball 50' from the last trap, let down while going forward at idle following the contour line, never paid attention to wind or current.
     
  20. Capt_Ed

    Capt_Ed Crew Member

     
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