Best 25 footer

Discussion in 'Boats, Motors, Trailers and Towing Rigs Forum' started by kaelc, Oct 15, 2017.

  1. Viking

    Viking Active Member

  2. Old Blue

    Old Blue Active Member

    That Pursuit is a beautiful boat and probably a really nice ride. "New motor" seems to tingle the spidey senses
     
  3. kaelc

    kaelc Well-Known Member

    They should really throw a second electric down rigger on that Shamrock, I think it has been for sale a year and half? The Monaro has been for sale for a longggg time too. Not a huge fan of paying over 100k including taxes for a 20 year old boat and trailer, they are likely asking 10k for the trailer as well.
     
  4. Rain City

    Rain City Well-Known Member

    I've been following this thread for a while and for some reason been reluctant to give my opinion. Well, that "some reason" is obvious, Bayliners get a bad rap on here. And so does anything newer than 95 it seems lol. I have a 2006 bayliner 245 cruiser and although it has it's limitations I've been really happy with it overall. It has a 5.0L gas with a Alpha 1 leg. It cruises at 28mph at 3500 rpm and up to 38mph WOT. It takes big water like a champ, can sleep four, has a decent kitchen and head and with a few upgrades is now a fishing machine. The best part about it is I paid $26k for it almost four years ago. I keep saying that I'm going to go bigger soon but the reality is you just don't get this much bang for your buck in any other boat. Good luck with the search, I know the struggle is real.
     
    Sir Reel, kaelc, alumaman and 2 others like this.
  5. bigdogeh

    bigdogeh Well-Known Member

    My First boat for the ocean was a 93 bayliner 2650. It was a great boat as well and handled the rough stuff with ease. It really felt like a solid boat. No regrets owning it and spent quite a few nights on the hook with it. . I sold it to a friend about 10 years ago for 10K and he is still running it and happy with it.
     
    Rain City likes this.
  6. kaelc

    kaelc Well-Known Member

    I appreciate that Rain City and Bigdogeh, you might just save me 10-30k. I've got my eye on a nice Bayliner that I can easily afford but I keep thinking I need a serious fishing boat when there are lots of Bayliners slaying (and there is going to be limited fishing in the future). My brother loves his 2855 (I think that's the model), but he doesn't fish on it.

    How is it for launching/loading from the trailer?
    Do you have a kicker and does it keep it on course pretty well in most conditions?
    Do you ever fish for halibut using a hali anchor?
    What do you get for mpg and range with your 245?
    What do you think the boat and trailer weight are when you are gassed up with gear?
    What do you have for a heater for overnight?

    Thanks again,
     
  7. kaelc

    kaelc Well-Known Member

    Loved your quote "the struggle is real" I'm up at 3:43 am reading reviews about 17 year old boats, looking at the fuel capacity, range, thinking how much of a loan I can afford, how far a drive it is to pick the boat up and which fishing buddy has a truck that can pull it and would come with me. God help me, buy the boat and go fishing!!!
     
    Rain City likes this.
  8. bigdogeh

    bigdogeh Well-Known Member

    Launching, loading would be no different than any other boat that size. The 245 would be a bit easier I would think. It is a nice size for sure. I used to launch mine myself every once in awhile without too much difficulty.
    I only had a kicker when in the ocean and not always as my friend owned the kicker. (6HP) Never ever used it as we always trolled on the main. A kicker might be more fuel efficent though. I have to admit the 350 inboard was a pig on gas compared to the diesel I have now. Prob worked out to 80 -100 a day for fuel roughly. We used to go from Prince rupert up to the end of dundas, fish for 2 or 3 days, then head back to prince rupert. I think we prob took a 5 gal jerry can or 2 with us when we went. It's about a 40 mile trip one way. usually went hull speed to conserve fuel on the way there and back. But went on plane the odd time also if conditions were good. I think the boat carried about 65 US gals...
    Never fished for hali with a hali anchor that I can remember.
    Boat and trailer loaded was around 6,500#
    We just used a propane heater or the alcohol stove to warm things up if we got cold. But I would be tempted to get one of the diesel planar heaters or something similar as they have come down alot in price....
    Fished with 4 altogether quite often, but three wouldn't be quite as cramped.
     
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  9. Rain City

    Rain City Well-Known Member

    I installed a 9.9 long shaft myself and it works great in good to moderate conditions. If not for fishing it's kept me off the rocks a couple times in emergency situations. When it's really blowing or if I'm fishing through all the weekend warriors at the Cap (cringe) I fish off the main for more maneuverability, tough to maintain the right speed on the main though.
    I've never anchored for Hali but have gotten pretty good at backing into the current with the kicker when jigging for Lings.
    On long hauls, I'm not going to lie, fuel and water need to be planned for. We did 9 days up to Desolation from Burrard Civic last year and averaged our fuel at 65L-70L per hour at cruising speed. With a 65 Gallon tank that's about 3.5 hours at 25 mph or about 85 miles of travel per tank. Now with a hot shower and a wife on board you're going to need to bring lots of water. The tank is good for two nights max. On long hauls I freeze 10L bottles that stack nicely in my "food only" cooler and use that as potable water as it melts. You'd be surprised how tough it is to get water from people on most of the islands.
    For heat there is the stock heater that blows at my feet on deck and into the cabin. It only gets hot when underway so when overnighting I'll either use a little ceramic heater on shore power or bring a generator ideally. Worst case Ontario I crack the vents and make a really long pot of coffee.
    As far as fishing goes three people is ideal. On calm hot days I've done boozy trips with 6-7 people all over the place but then it's way less about the fishing.
    My boat is moored full time but have trailered it a few times. The 245 is way bigger than my first 18' Maxum but like anything you get used to it. I believe fully loaded I'm around 7000 lbs.

    I'm pretty sure my wife thinks I'm cheating on her now.
     
    kaelc likes this.
  10. spring fever

    spring fever Well-Known Member

    The Skagit 24 xlc will sleep 3 guys and the 27 has exactly the same cabin only difference is a bigger dance floor. Can't say enough about the Orca's sea keeping and fit and finish. I've owned mine since new in 03-re-engined once to a 300 yammi. If I lost mine for some reason I would look for another!
     
    Thunder21 and bones like this.
  11. tubber

    tubber Well-Known Member

  12. ab1752

    ab1752 Member

    Tons of great advice here for sure. We have a Hourston 26' Island Runner and use it primarily as a picnic / fish boat in the southern / central Georgia Straits with occasional over night runs. I have run it up as far as Bute Inlet and all around the Savary / Secret Cove areas. It has the standard Volvo Penta 350 DP and when I replaced the leg 2 years ago I moved to F3's from F5's and it made a world of difference as it was over propped with the F5's for sure. I have had times where I was likely pushing the limits of our boat in heavy seas when it was only myself out there but I do feel that a 26' well built hull is a great size for the waters we run in. I am seriously considering moving to a 30' + to provide an additional level of range, comfort and safety for some of the more nasty days when the winds and tides are ripping.

    I have a good friend who has had 3 factory built Monaros and they are seriously great boats, I would not hesitate to buy one that they have resold as Dan takes great pride in his brand, new or previously enjoyed.
     
    getbent likes this.
  13. noluck

    noluck Active Member

    monaro is going to be releasing a new fishing boat @the Vancouver boat show this year, looks like a nice boat when i saw it a couple of weeks ago
     
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  14. ab1752

    ab1752 Member

    I should have added I would convert this boat to a pod if I was to keep it. Hourston built a few Island Runners with a pod but unfortunately sending it back to them for a conversion does not appear to be an option any longer. I am more comfortable with outboards or inboards than a I/O for our waters with all the junk that is out there plus fishing around the doghouse is a PITA.
     
  15. dmurph

    dmurph Well-Known Member

    One thing to keep in mind is that if you plan to have child and wife on board for most of your trips then get into a pilot house style where most of the amenities are above water. Unless your pretty much docked or in really calm waters most people will find themselves seasick if down below in cuddy. I spend 3 days a week fishing around spring to fall with the wife and boy who is now 6 but has been on this routine since 2 months old.
     
    Rain City likes this.
  16. dmurph

    dmurph Well-Known Member

    Your gonna want a spot where the family can be real comfortable at all times in all conditions on the boat.
     
    Rain City likes this.
  17. dance a jig

    dance a jig Member

  18. spring fever

    spring fever Well-Known Member

  19. c1steve

    c1steve New Member

    A 3/4 ton truck will haul a 23' boat as well as a 27'+ boat. I would get as large a boat as I could, if three of you plan to spend a few days on the boat. I would avoid a pod drive, or a diesel outdrive boat. Outboard would be ideal, but a good I/O would work. One problem with many I/Os is engine access, so take a careful look at that. Volvo has the nice D4 diesel, but I repeatedly hear reports that the outdrives do not hold up at all. Volvo parts are crazy expensive as well.

    Ospreys are nice boats as well. A 24'/26' I/O Osprey will only achieve 1.5 mpg. This is common with many deep vee boats that weigh in the 5,000-8,000 lb. range.
     
  20. pescador

    pescador Well-Known Member

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