Yukon First Nation tries new way to replenish Chinook salmon stocks

Discussion in 'Conservation, Fishery Politics and Management.' started by agentaqua, Jul 13, 2017.

  1. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

    Chuck and bones like this.
  2. Dave

    Dave Well-Known Member

    Actually this enhancement technique is not new and has been used successfully on sockeye in both the Horsefly and Upper Adams rivers.
     
    Chuck and Dogbreath like this.
  3. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

    Thanks, dave. Any data available as to how successful this methodology is?
     
  4. Dave

    Dave Well-Known Member

    The Horsefly eyed egg plant was done in the 70's; Stellako females were spawned with Horsefly jacks and planted in the Horsefly townsite area to add a lower river component of sockeye to this river. One cycle later sockeye were observed spawning in this area where previously they had only been observed in the upper river near McKinley Creek.

    The Upper Adams project was done in the early 80's; eyed eggs were the progeny of returning spawners composed of Cayenne Creek males and females, and a very few pairs of Upper Adams fish.
    This transplant proved very successful and was the beginning of the turn around for this nearly extirpated sockeye stock. All work was done by the IPSFC led by Ian Williams; the Upper Adams project was published but I'm not sure if it is available online ... if anyone can find it, it's you aa;)

    Happy to say I was involved in both projects .. not often you can look back and say you actually made a difference.
     
    Fishtofino likes this.
  5. Chuck

    Chuck Active Member

    I am no scientist but with such hi mortality rates that a ocean run fish has to go through during it's travels I would think that letting of 38000 fertilized egg into the river is not even close to what it needs to be.. Glad to see, better than not at all..
     
  6. papalorge

    papalorge Member

    Could be totally wrong here but... does it not make sense to put hatchery's closer to the ocean? Adding to the Adams river fish is great but 100's of km of river before they get to the lake increases mortality exponentially and eventually (over the years) those fish will not stand a chance. We can work as much as possible on the small river systems cleaning and caring for them but the Fraser is a working industrial site that will continue to be polluted.
    Fish problems are not going to change that.

    For human purposes if we really want just numbers of fish or pieces as commercial and DFO would say, would a Port Alberni style set up not be ideal? Short run up the river right into the lake
     
  7. Chuck

    Chuck Active Member

    You would think that would be optimal for the fish. But lest we forget who's controlling these decisions..
     
  8. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

    p.235-242: www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/Library/103523.pdf "The 1912 cycle Upper Adams run, after two egg transplants, and one fry and one fingerling transplant, is beginning to show some results. While there were no significant returns to the Upper Adams River on the cycle years following the egg or fingerling transplants, an early run did develop in the Momich-Cayenne system.".
     
  9. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

    yes and no - dependent upon species under culture. Sockeye juvies need their own lake - why may be some distance from the ocean. Pinks and chum need not a whole lot wrt freshwater rearing - and should be released close to the ocean. Coho and Chinook - depends....
     
  10. Dave

    Dave Well-Known Member

    Good sleuthing!! If I recall 36,000 returned in mid 90's ; next cycle they were hammered by the commies ...
     

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