Viruses in present bc salmon farms

Discussion in 'Conservation, Fishery Politics and Management.' started by Salmonholic, Oct 1, 2016.

  1. Salmonholic

    Salmonholic Member

    Dfo site says no Atlantic salmon eggs imported from 1985 to 2009 have been from Norway . So I wonder when and where the present viruses are from in the bc fish farms . Agentaqua you seem to be say on articles , any idea ?
     
  2. StormTrooper

    StormTrooper Active Member

    I know of a company on Vancouver Island that sold Atlantic salmon roe skeins that were harvested and processed on Vancouver Island that were sold as bait into the local market that was used both on the Island and the Fraser river system...maybe many more rivers and lakes. I have no idea if disease can be transferred into various river systems throughout BC that way or not, but it does not sound like a good idea or in the best practices model of the precautionary principle to me. I have no idea if DFO even knew of the transactions or not. I am not talking, a hand full of skeins, but thousands of pounds of Atlantic salmon roe.
     
  3. Dave

    Dave Well-Known Member

    What present viruses are you referring to?
     
  4. Salmonholic

    Salmonholic Member

    Agentaqua , I meant to say say on articles . Dave , I am referring to (prv) , (isav) ,and (ihnv) .
     
  5. Salmonholic

    Salmonholic Member

    Savy , darn spell check
     
  6. GLG

    GLG Well-Known Member

    My guess would be from any of these places.....
    Scotland
    Washington State
    New Brunswick
    Ireland
    and of course Iceland
    http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/aquaculture/reporting-rapports/egg-oeuf-eng.html
     
  7. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

  8. bigdogeh

    bigdogeh Well-Known Member

  9. Dave

    Dave Well-Known Member

    Here's a slightly different answer to your question ...I don't think anyone denies there are a few non virulent strains of ISAv on the Pacific coast but credible and qualified (key words) researchers from Washington, BC and Alaska have found no evidence of ISA, the disease. This is relatively easy to test as there are no net pen Atlantic's or Cowichan River Brown Trout dying from this disease. If it was here, there would be measurable mortalities.
    These same researchers believe PRv has been on the Pacific coast, including Alaska, before salmon farms were established.
    IHNv is endemic to this coast and all net pen salmon that have contracted this disease did so from contact with wild or hatchery Pacific salmon or other hosts.

    I think it comes down to whether you believe the government officials of Washington, BC and Alaska are involved in some sort of conspiracy to promote BC and Washington salmon farms. If you do, there is nothing anyone could say to change your minds. Hey, Trump might be the next President of the US so anything is believable to some.
     
  10. bigdogeh

    bigdogeh Well-Known Member

    It's this type of thinking that DFO and the current liberal government rely upon. sadly, the reason he may become president or has gotten this far is that people are tired of being lied to by government and they're tired of being sold out to the corporations by politicians. anyone that reads the article http://northerninsights.blogspot.ca/search/label/fishery or the cohen report can obviously see that there is a conspiracy between CFIA and DFO to protect and promote the aquaculture industry at the expense of our wild salmon. I challenge most to read it, do their own research and come to their own conclusions on who is telling the truth and who is trying their best to hide it. who is putting the welfare of our wild salmon first and who is putting the welfare of the salmon farms and industry first....at the expense of our wild salmon, the ecosystem and environment.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2016
  11. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

    Sometimes the "different" part of an answer is also the "incorrect" part and/or the purposely misleading part that came back from the scriptwriters.

    In the "wild" - fish that die or are nearly dead - are either eaten by predators quickly - or sink. Out of sight - out of mind for some apparently. These mortalities would not be "measurable". The person pushing the unsupported hypothesis that PRv was here before farms is the Province's fish vet - who could be held liable in a court of law for not discharging his fiduciary duty by not informing FN of a potential impact/infringement to their resources - or could be held liable in a class-action lawsuit over loss of income by commercial and recreational fisheries. see:
    http://virologyj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12985-015-0459-1
    http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0082202
    https://virologyj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1743-422X-10-230
     
  12. Dave

    Dave Well-Known Member

    True enough for Cowichan browns but totally wrong for net penned Atlantic's. ISA is a CFIA reportable disease and must be documented, and if it was the farmers would be compensated. In todays age of social media any large die off of farmed Atlantics would be front page news; it hasn't happened.
    Why would Alaska say ISA is not present there, when if it was, their fisheries would lose their only competition, that being farmed fish?
     
    bones likes this.
  13. Salmonholic

    Salmonholic Member

    The strategic salmon health initiative launched in 2013 with Brian Riddell and Kristi Miller as project leaders . This is an intensive testing of wild and farmed salmon for microbes . Unfortunately we will not hear the results until 2018 - 2020 . Hopefully -CFIA- will be honest about the results . Let's also hope wild salmon will survive and thrive so we can continue to fish them .
     
  14. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

    I predict CFIA will try to ignore the results again - since it is not an OIE-approved test.
     
  15. Dave

    Dave Well-Known Member

    Ah agent ... I know you mistrust the CFIA (and all government) but understand, Brian Riddell will not try to hide whatever is found. He left a highly respected senior scientist position in DFO so he would not be told what to say or report.
    Call me naïve if you wish but I trust this man to tell the truth.
     
  16. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

    I respect Brian. Doubt if he has any more pull with CFIA than anyone else, though.
     
  17. Birdsnest

    Birdsnest Well-Known Member

    So Washington and Alaska are in on this "conspiracy" as well Agent?
     
  18. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

    the "C" in CFIA stands for "Canadian", BN.
     
  19. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

    A. Morton, R. Routledge. 2016. Risk and precaution: Salmon farming. Marine Policy 74 (2016): http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X16304390

    ABSTRACT

    The salmon farming industry uses coastal, temperate marine waters to culture salmon in flow-through net pens. As marine currents pass through salmon farms, pathogens are carried in both directions between two highly contrasting environments. When wild fish are infected with pathogens spilling from the farm environment, the natural mechanisms that work to prevent epizootics become inoperative. The 18-year decline of Canada's largest salmon fishery, on Fraser River Sockeye Salmon, triggered a comprehensive federal commission to determine the cause. Two of the recommendations from this commission call for removal of the salmon farms from the Discovery Islands of British Columbia (BC), a bottleneck in the Sockeye Salmon migration route, if the evidence indicates that the industry generates greater than minimal risk of serious harm to the Fraser River Sockeye Salmon. Risk is interpreted as a probability and ‘minimal risk’, in the context of the Precautionary Principle, as a cut-off level on the strength of the scientific evidence needed to justify precautionary measures. Here the available evidence of the risk caused by sea lice and viruses from salmon farms on wild salmon is considered. From this perspective, the evidence is unambiguous. Salmon farms in the region of the Discovery Islands generate greater than minimal risk of serious harm to Fraser River Sockeye Salmon. Furthermore, there is no evidence that the risk factors identified are specific to Fraser River Sockeye Salmon, as many of them apply to other areas and salmon species in the north eastern Pacific and globally.
     
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  20. bigdogeh

    bigdogeh Well-Known Member

    It seems our government has set itself up for an eventual major class action lawsuit...
    it's not a wonder they fight tooth and nail to try to discredit anyone who has an opinion that these virus factories are causing harm...


    we Canadians and members of the public are so fortunate to have such virtuous leaders at the heads of our government institutions...(sarcasm)
     
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