SFI Up date

Discussion in 'Important Meetings, Derbys and SFBC Get Togethers' started by Derby, Aug 17, 2016.

  1. Derby

    Derby Well-Known Member

    June 15, 2017



    The 2017 season is upon us. Whether off Vancouver, Powell River, the north end of the island, the central and north coast or Haida Gwaii, many are out on the water and reports of a good start to a summer of fishing are coming in. While it is getting busy and there are many distractions we thought we'd provide a few brief update details from the SFI team;



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    2017 West Coast Vancouver Island Guide DNA \ Log Book Program


    June marks the start of data collection for the 2017 WCVI DNA\Log Book Program which the SFI undertakes in collaboration with DFO and the West Coast Fishing Guides Association. 2016 saw a significant increase in participation from guides across the WCVI, we look forward to building on that success in 2017. The catch data collected and submitted by guides through this program is necessary to continue to offer improved fishing opportunities within the corridor and inside the major sounds. We urge all guides, lodges and charters to participate and to demonstrate the sustainability of our fishery.

    Meetings to share information about the program and to build participation are currently scheduled for:

    Date and Time Location
    June 20 at 7:00 p.m.: Middle Beach Lodge, Tofino - Area 24
    June 21 at 7:00 p.m.: Ucluelet Community Center, Ucluelet - Area 23
    June 27 at 6:00 p.m.: Port Renfrew (final location TBD) - Area 20

    These meetings will provide support and technical advice to participants, a summary of data collected thus far and examples of how the data is used. Data collected by individual guides in 2016 will be returned with analysis. And, an update on 2017 Yelloweye rockfish conservation measures is on the agenda. In order to help educate guides and anglers as to the urgent need for everyone to use descending devices to prevent barotrauma related mortality in rockfish species, the SFI will be providing free descending to all guides who participate in the log book program. We are able to do this due to a generous donation by Sid Keay of Duncanby Lodge. Thank you Sid for your consistent support of sustainability in our fishery!



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    Yelloweye Rockfish - Descending Devices


    Yelloweye Rockfish is Species at Risk along our coastline. They are not a target fish but many anglers encounter Yelloweye (and other rockfish) while fishing for other species. When caught and brought rapidly to the surface Rockfish suffer from Barotrauma. This is the life threatening condition, referred to as the "bends" in deep water scuba divers, which causes nitrogen bubbles to form in the blood stream and tissue. In Rockfish it causes eyes to bulge and stomachs to be forced inside out and unless the fish are returned to a similar depth from which they were captured they will die.

    What can you do to help? There are a few things that you can do to help the Yelloweye Rockfish population. There is scientific evidence that shows that if a Rockfish is returned to a similar depth to which it was caught within 5 minutes of reaching the surface, they have an excellent chance of survival.

    And, as the poster above indicates, take steps to avoid Yelloweye habitat when fishing for other species, ensure you know how to properly identify the species, acquire and be prepared to use a descending device to get an incidentally caught Yelloweye (or any Rockfish) you don't plan to keep back to depth as soon as possible and make sure, when asked, to report your catch as accurately as possible.


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    2017 Policy Conference and Big Splash Gala Fundraiser - SAVE THE DATE!


    We have set the date for the 2017 Big Splash Gala Fundraiser and Industry Policy Conference. For the first time in many years we plan to take both events to downtown Vancouver. Please mark Thursday, November 23rd, at the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver on your calendars. We know it’s early, but it’s never too early to save the date. Much more information to follow.

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    Hooked on Lifejackets - Canadian Safe Boating Counsil
    July 1st to 9th marks National Fishing Week in Canada. The Canadian Safe Boating Council (CSBC) wants to remind anglers that wearing your lifejacket is even more important than wearing your ‘lucky fishing hat’. But they do share one trait. They both must be worn to be effective!

    According to the Canadian Safe Boating Council and the Lifesaving Society, 80 percent of recreational boaters who drown each year in Canada were not wearing a lifejacket or Personal Floatation Device (PFD). Most of these drownings occur in small, open power boats, accounting for 60 percent of these preventable deaths. Many these victims were males between the ages of 19 and 35, out for a day of fishing.

    Many of those who don’t wear their lifejackets or PFDs believe that, since they are good swimmers, having them on board and within easy reach is good enough. But a lifejacket stored under a seat or up in the bow will be of no help when the unexpected happens, like falling overboard while trying to net the catch.

    The Canadian Safe Boating Council understands that we’ve gotten our families hooked on fishing. We just want to get everyone hooked on lifejackets as well! For more information, check out their website: http://csbc.ca/en/

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    "Giants Among Us - Rick Hansen and the Great White Sturgeon" Film Premier


    Filmmaker Robert Moberg is premiering his documentary "Giants Among Us - Rick Hansen and the Great White Sturgeon" at the Goldcorp Centre for the arts on June 24th. Rick Hansen will be in attendance and speak as part of the introduction. World Rivers Day founder Mark Angelo will also speak. "Giants Among Us - Rick Hansen and the Great White Sturgeon" is a film with a strong message of conservation and environmental awareness. Come celebrate Canada’s birthday by following the incredible lifespan of a 150 year old Sturgeon in the Fraser River. Please share with your networks to get the word out on this important film. Trailer https://vimeo.com/198250938

    Until next time. Tight lines,
    The SFI Team


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    Android Version coming soon...
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  2. Derby

    Derby Well-Known Member

    June 28, 2017



    SUMMER BEGINS
    As the summer officially begins with the change of season and a mini heat wave just behind us and kids cut loose from the regular school routine, here are a few updates and reminders for the height of the season to come.

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    WHALES

    Often a great sign that bait is around and salmon too, whales, whether the Orca variety or the much larger Humpback, are a fantastic part of the fishing experience along the coast of BC. With the increased numbers of humpbacks, it is important to take care and follow guidelines when you suspect there may be whales in the area.

    Once drastically reduced in numbers due to whaling (up to 1967 in BC), there are currently an estimated 3,000 to 5,000 Humpback Whales that feed in the waters of BC before migrating to southern breeding grounds.

    Avoiding Collision
    As baleen whales, Humpbacks do not have biosonar (echolocation) in the way that toothed whales do. As many of us have experienced, they can be very unaware of boats and surface very unpredictably. They are very large whales so collision can have severe consequences for boaters.

    To increase safety for boaters and marine wildlife:

    • Always be on the lookout for blows.
    • Go slow if you see a blow.
    • Be alert for large aggregations of birds.
    • Increase vigilance in areas of known whale density and where vessels are flying the "Whale Watch Flag” indicating that whales are near.
    • For more information see www.mersociety.org/blowgoslow.
    • If, despite this vigilance, you experience or witness a collision, please call the DFO Incident Reporting Line at 1-800-465-4336 (or VHF Channel 16)
    Entanglement
    Is it also recognized that there is overlap between human and Humpback fishing activity and that this can lead to loss of gear and entanglement of whales.

    What to do in case of entanglement:

    • Report entanglement with location to the DFO Incident Reporting Line at 1-800-465-4336 or VHF Channel 16.
    • If possible, remain with the whale at a distance, until professional help arrives or another boat is able to take over tracking.
    • Do NOT attempt to disentangle the whale yourself. Without training, there is high risk to human and whale safety. Removing trailing gear makes the whale more difficult to relocate and reduces the chance of successful disentanglement.
    Further Information?
    The Marine Education and Research Society wants to be of help. If you have any questions, contact the MER Society at mersociety@gmail.com or 250-956-3525. Humpback Whale ID catalogues, “See a Blow? Go Slow!” signage, and Humpback Whale Sponsorship packages are available.


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    WRFC8 SURVEY


    Whether you plan to attend the 8th World Recreational Fishing Conference in Victoria this July or not, you can still be part of the discussion and contribute valuable information from a British Columbia perspective. More information about the conference here: www.wrfc8.com

    Please read the following invitation to participate in a survey designed to collect perspectives about recreational fishing.

    In July 2017, recreational fisheries scientists and managers will meet in Victoria to share stories and information to advance the management and conservation of recreational fisheries. We hope to use this opportunity to develop a set of questions that will help guide research into the state and future of both marine and freshwater recreational fisheries from the perspectives of scientists, managers, anglers, and other stakeholders interested in sustainable recreational fisheries.

    We have prepared a brief form to solicit ideas that we hope will be shared widely with a broad audience of different stakeholders in hopes of collecting information on pressing questions that scientists can use to guide their research in coming years. Survey Link Here. As someone with an interest in recreational fisheries, we hope that you will share your perspectives with us.



    Thank you,
    Dr. Steven J. Cooke

    Canada Research Chair in Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology
    Director of the Institute of Environmental Science
    Professor of Environmental Science and Biology
    Carleton University
     
  3. Derby

    Derby Well-Known Member

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    WCVI GUIDE DNA / LOG BOOK PROGRAM UPDATE

    June marked the start of data collection for the 2017 WCVI DNA\Log Book Program. The SFI works in collaboration with DFO and the West Coast Fishing Guides Association to provide training, materials and in season support to participants. The program is off to a good start to the credit of all the guides who have chosen to continue or participate for the first time this year.

    The catch data collected and submitted by guides through this program have shown that management changes on WCVI in 2016 have provided increased opportunity on abundant enhanced stocks, while successfully avoiding stocks of concern. By sharing the responsibility for proving the case for a sustainable and responsible fishery, guides are doing their part to provide increased opportunity for all anglers along the WCVI. We urge all guides, lodges and charters to do your part to ensure a bright future for this world class chinook fishery. It takes about ten minutes a day to make a difference! Contact the SFI to obtain your sampling materials.



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    YELLOWEYE ROCKFISH

    As mentioned earlier in the year, this is a message and topic that we will continue to relay for the season and foreseeable future. We hope that by sharing this information, you can help to build awareness and educate fellow anglers and the public regarding the care and attention that Yelloweye Rockfish now require.

    Yelloweye Rockfish are a Species at Risk in the outside waters of our coast. They are not generally a targeted fish but many anglers encounter Yelloweye while fishing for other species. When caught and brought rapidly to the surface Rockfish suffer from Barotrauma. This is the life threatening condition, referred to as the "bends" in deep water scuba divers, which causes nitrogen bubbles to form in the blood stream and tissue. Unless rockfish are returned to depth quickly, it is usually fatal.

    What can we all do to help? There are a few things that can be done to help the Yelloweye Rockfish population. There is scientific evidence that shows that if a Rockfish is returned to a similar depth to which it was caught within 5 minutes of reaching the surface, they have an excellent chance of survival. A descending device should become as much a standard part of an anglers essential tool kit as a pair of pliers. Better yet, avoid catching them at all once you have retained your limit.

    Take steps to avoid Yelloweye and Yelloweye habitat when fishing for other species. If you find yourself catching and releasing Yelloweye, move to another area. Please ensure you know how to properly identify the species, acquire and be prepared to use a descending device to get an incidentally caught Yelloweye (or any Rockfish) you don't plan to keep back to depth as soon as possible and make sure when asked, to report your catch accurately. Please note the use of a descending device in any catch reporting you participate in. Descending devices are increasingly available at tackle shops all along the coast.



    MAPPING TIDAL WATERS RECREATIONAL FISHING ACTIVITY IN BC

    The tidal waters recreational fishery of British Columbia is both vast and complex in its geographic footprint, species diversity, methods of harvest and rate of participation. Involving close to 300,000 licensed anglers in 2017, and operating over the full calendar year, the fishery is also highly significant in accounting for over 49% of the total GDP of all fisheries combined in BC. In Canada, recreational fishing generates 8.4 billion in revenue annually and provides important social benefits to participants of all ages and backgrounds.

    On behalf of DFO, the SFI is seeking volunteers for input and to contribute their personal and observed knowledge via an online or in-person interview. The objective is to note all fishing activity for finfish, crabs and prawns throughout the year and throughout the coast. It is expected that an interview will take less than an hour and can be done in person or in an online format.

    Accurately mapping the activities of this large, important fishery is particularly important and timely. The upcoming MPA and OPP and the potential to inform those processes with well documented and sourced information is critically important as details are gathered and decisions are made. This project is an opportunity to ensure that recreational fishing activity is properly noted in any area of the coast where it occurs by providing a historical and present-day snapshot.

    DFO is building on existing yet limited information about the recreational sector. The rise of marine spatial planning has increased the importance of providing socio-economic analysis at the local scale for a variety of ocean sectors including the recreational sector.

    Please be in touch with the SFI at mapping@sportfishing.bc.ca or 250.591.0734 if you are interested to learn more or you would like to schedule a discussion about an area of the coast that you are familiar with and have fished extensively.

    Until next time. Tight lines,
    The SFI Team

    Check out the new FishingBC app:
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    Android coming in August!
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  4. Derby

    Derby Well-Known Member

    July 6, 2017



    INTERESTING TIMES

    We hope you had an excellent Canada Day long weekend and took advantage of the weather and extra time to get out and wet a line.

    These are interesting times for recreational sport fishing in BC. We are encouraged to see the season get underway with many reports of great fishing north and south on our coast. At the same time, it is notable that opportunities are being effected in different ways and by changing forces. Some seem climate based and impact where salmon choose to travel while at the same time present opportunities to fish for tuna on a regular basis and closer to our shores. The SFI will continue to work hard to promote the idea that sport fishing opportunities can be protected and improved with education and awareness about catch and economic impacts on fish and fisheries. Improvements and changes seem to be taking place within DFO, yet at the same time we are concerned by recent decisions that appear to be based more on political pressure than on good science. We will also continue to urge DFO to make decisions based on best information and evidence rather than influence from strategically timed input into an increasingly challenging political environment.

    It is the SFI’s continual aim to work at generating better data and information about recreational fisheries impacts. This is important as it also provides evidence about the effects of unnecessarily reduced opportunities. We are already seeing evidence along the WCVI and Strait of Georgia where more precise stock composition and catch data has preserved or even improved opportunity.

    Our sector contributes nearly $1 billion annually to the BC economy, yet resources dedicated to managing our fisheries and opportunities are being eroded or directed elsewhere. Imagine what could be learned if 250,000 anglers were engaged and contributing catch and observational data on the water. The potential positive effects of increased education and awareness of those who spend time on our coast and appreciate our resources simply can’t be overstated. And, the need to consistently educate DFO managers and senior bureaucrats regarding the positive impacts of sport fishing to our economy and our lives is an important part of that message. Rest assured that we undertake this task on your behalf consistently

    As mentioned, we see cause for optimism that DFO will make positive changes to how it manages sport fishing in BC. We are pleased to note the involvement of the Department in the upcoming World Recreational Fishing Conference and the recent $1.4 Billion announcement by the Minister that was dedicated to fisheries management, among other things.

    PINK SALMON

    Speaking of opportunities, as this is a strong Pink salmon year in many rivers on the BC coast, don’t forget to take advantage of the chance to introduce kids to fishing from shore or boat for Pink salmon. When they migrate through the marine approaches, and arrive back to estuarine environments the action can be very exciting. Pinks are easy to catch whether on spinning gear, on the fly or by trolling anything pink. And when fresh and ocean caught Pink salmon are as good table fare as any salmon.

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    The Fishing BC program, a joint cooperative with FFSBC, BFROA and the SFI, is underway and promoting all that’s good in BC when it comes to sport fishing. Expect more information through the late summer and fall regarding how you can be involved and take advantage of various promotional opportunities ranging from consumer show discounts, consumer show representation, social and traditional media and content generation. Visit FishingBC.com for an idea of what is being shared on the internet and across borders about fishing opportunities in BC.

    AWARENESS AND EDUCATION

    Our coast is home to some spectacular variety and wealth of fish, fisheries and habitat. While many are healthy there are some areas and species that require special care and attention. Two examples;

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    GLASS SPONGE REEF

    BC’s glass sponge reefs are thousands of years old, globally unique, and very fragile. These reefs provide important habitat for species like rockfish and spot prawns. Fishing gear and boat anchors can destroy these fragile ecosystems and the species that depend on them.

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    YELLOWEYE ROCKFISH

    Just a few words this time… a reminder to avoid Yelloweye rockfish when possible, educate friends and guests and to check out descenders as soon as you can. We are happy to report the distribution of 200 descending devices and associated educational material to guides, lodges and charters all along the WCVI as part of our log book\DNA sampling program. Guides are reporting that their guests are happy to be part of the solution, and feel good about doing their part towards conservation and rebuilding. Well done all of you who are on board, and keep spreading the word! Many thanks again to Sid Keay of Duncanby Lodge for making 1000 devices available, to Deryk Krefting for his efforts to coordinate those and support materials and to Wayne Yamauchi of Deep Blue Sales for making the Seaqualizer a more readily available option for anglers along the coast.


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    WRFC8


    Once every three years, the World Recreational Fishing Conference takes place somewhere in the world. 2017 the conference returns to BC and Canada, taking place in Victoria from July 16 - 20. Whether you plan to attend or not, you can still be part of the discussion and contribute valuable information from a British Columbia perspective. More information about the conference is here: www.wrfc8.com

    Please read the following invitation to participate in a survey designed to collect perspectives about recreational fishing.

    In July 2017, recreational fisheries scientists and managers will meet in Victoria to share stories and information to advance the management and conservation of recreational fisheries. We hope to use this opportunity to develop a set of questions that will help guide research into the state and future of both marine and freshwater recreational fisheries from the perspectives of scientists, managers, anglers, and other stakeholders interested in sustainable recreational fisheries.

    We have prepared a brief form to solicit ideas that we hope will be shared widely with a broad audience of different stakeholders in hopes of collecting information on pressing questions that scientists can use to guide their research in coming years. Survey Link Here. As someone with an interest in recreational fisheries, we hope that you will share your perspectives with us.



    Thank you,
    Dr. Steven J. Cooke

    Canada Research Chair in Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology
    Director of the Institute of Environmental Science
    Professor of Environmental Science and Biology
    Carleton University



    Until next time. Tight lines,
    The SFI Team

    Check out the new FishingBC app:
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    Android coming in August!
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  5. Derby

    Derby Well-Known Member

    July 25, 2017



    Closing in on August and we hope everyone is busy and fishing. Our thoughts are also with the many communites, friends and families affected by what seems to be an especially bad wildfire season this year.



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    WRFC8


    The World Recreational Fishing Conference took place last week in Victoria, BC. While the mid-season timing was challenging for many who might have been interested to attend, the conference was a great success. Delegates from 21 countries around the globe attended the 4-day conference hosted by the Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC with assistance from the SFI. SFI members and board were in attendance and helped sponsor – thank you to Langara Fishing Adventures, St. Jean’s Cannery, Islander Reels, Island Outfitters, Bass Pro Shops and many others for contributions, participation, and assistance providing visitors with a tremendous introduction to recreational fishing in BC.

    Held every 3 years, the 8th WRFC was the best attended to date. Nearly 400 delegates began the conference with a presentation by Rick Hansen, who shared his long history and passion for fish and fisheries and encouraged everyone to strive for accessibility for all no matter the environment or location. The Conference attendees heard remarks from Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries, Terry Beech, MP. Aside from a fish tale or two, we learned of the plans for building on the $3 billion in financial commitments of DFO to include work with the recreational community and an acknowledgement of the values of recreational fishing both social and economic across Canada. Many DFO staff were in attendance throughout the conference, and presented on various activities specific to the Pacific region, collaborative work with the SFI and the recreational community generally.

    Topics and discussion varied widely ranging from the purely scientific to the social and philosophical. While the subjects and discussion were as diverse as the attendees, it is clear that catch data, catch monitoring and engagement of the angling public are increasingly important to fisheries everywhere. The SFI and DFO jointly presented on the Guide Log book program which generated interest from a wide variety of international attendees. Considering the era in which we live, it should also come as no surprise that there is a proliferation of electronic devices and tactics developed in order to collect the data and share information. However, it was encouraging to share the Fishing BC app progress and learn that we are leading in our efforts to develop a process to submit catch data from recreational anglers to DFO systems. Understanding catch is the essential component of building awareness and educating any individual, agency, or organization that is involved with fish and fisheries. As a result, developing a strong understanding of catch, leading to education and awareness of that understanding served as an underlying theme of the conference. Dr. John Post, University of Calgary and Chair of the WRFC Scientific committee, summed things up by referring to a photo and comments Rick Hansen had shared earlier; simply that fishing is an essential part of who we are. Those who know the values of fish and fishing, whether scientist, angler or fisheries manager, have a responsibility to share that knowledge. Education and awareness of all aspects are essential in order to protect, promote and, where possible, enhance opportunities.

    The 9th WRFC will be held in Rotterdam, Netherlands. It is our goal to continue to make strides and be leaders in developing programs, gaining knowledge and realizing the potential of our fishery that we can share with others in 2020.



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    Catch Counts

    WCVI Guides - Samples and Log Books

    The program on the West Coast of Vancouver Island to increase the number of samples taken and log book data submitted by guides and lodge operations is going well. As we’ve reported before and shared with the WRFC attendees, the SFI is working with DFO to increase guide participation and to ensure that there is an appreciation that guides should be interested to participate and must contribute when requested.

    The Recreational Vision (that the DFO, SFAB and the Province developed) outlined an approach in which the recreational sector takes on greater responsibility for documenting its catch. This approach is summarized in Strategic Goal #7:

    Those who earn a living by providing services to the recreational fishery accept a greater share of the responsibility for conservation and management of the recreational fishery. This responsibility will be fulfilled through implementation of certification, standards and best practices within the charter boat and lodge industry around activities such as catch recording and reporting.”

    The guide log books and other angler based efforts to assist with counting our catch fall in step with these principles. Participation in catch data collection programs will ensure that regulation and opportunity changes are based on good information.

    We are pleased to report that the majority of guides we have met with are clearly invested in the future of the fishery, and are contributing this information on a voluntary basis rather than be compelled to do so by DFO. We are committed to maintaining this approach by working with the guide community to create a program that meets their needs, and recognizes that their primary function is to provide a world class experience to their clients.



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    Fishing BC

    The Fishing BC program, a joint cooperative with FFSBC, BCFROA and the SFI, is underway and promoting all that’s good in BC when it comes to sport fishing. Expect more information through the late summer and fall regarding how you can be involved and take advantage of various promotional opportunities ranging from consumer show discounts, consumer show representation, social and traditional media and content generation. Visit FishingBC.com for an idea of what is being shared on the internet and across borders about fishing opportunities in BC.

    Our coast is home to a spectacular variety and wealth of fish, fisheries and habitat. While many are healthy there are some areas and species that require special care and attention. One example;


    Yelloweye

    A reminder to avoid Yelloweye rockfish when possible, educate friends and guests and to check out descenders as soon as you can.

    Until Next time – tight lines

    The SFI Team
     
  6. Derby

    Derby Well-Known Member

    August 14, 2017



    As we near mid-August, we thought we'd take this opportunity to provide some details on a few different issues we've been tracking during the summer.



    Beware: Fish Handler's Disease

    Having to handle and clean any fish or prepare bait is a welcome part of the fishing season but there can be some serious skin and health issues that you should keep in mind.

    Fish Handler’s Disease - have you ever heard of it? Have you experienced small red lesions on your hands, joints, wrist, and or your lower arms? Have these caused you discomfort and stiff joints. Have you visited your Doctor and were prescribed an antibiotic, but are still plagued with this issue?

    If so, you may have acquired Fish Handlers Disease - FHD, but not to worry you will survive…

    What is FHD?
    If you are a person whom enjoys sport fishing, or are employed in the sport or commercial fishing industry, or exposed to aquatic fish tanks, you may be susceptible to bacteria identified as Mycobacterium Marinum. This bacterium is treatable, and is a common ailment in individuals whom engage in either saltwater or freshwater activities. However, if left untreated or miss-diagnosed, an infection can lead to serious complications.

    The Signs and Symptoms
    The signs and symptoms vary person to person, and in some cases, may be overlooked or initially ignored by the person experiencing the problem. The point of entry for the bacteria is a break in the skin, usually on the hands, which leads to a raised bluish spot which tends to increase in size each day. Untreated, it can lead to inflammation to the surrounding tissues, joints, or tendons, causing symptoms like arthritic or tendonitis pain. The bacteria grow slowly and may take 2 to 4 weeks to develop into a lesion. In some cases, this heals or disappears into nothing and is brushed off as something minor. But, please beware, as it can still effect joints or tendons.

    What should you do?
    First be proactive; consider wearing water-proof gloves at all times when you are exposed to fishy water or are handling fish. If you are experiencing symptoms you need to seek medical attention. And, because many doctors may not have encountered FHD, you should raise the possibility of FHD and Mycobaterium Marinum. If untreated or miss-diagnosed, FHD can lead to long term antibiotic therapy or even surgical procedures.

    If you are looking for further info on FHD please follow this link: Fish Handler's Disease

    Thank you to Dr. Neilson McLean, MD, Executive Air Ambulance Services, for providing this information.



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    Summer Chinook Shoot Out - August 19 and 20

    Thanks to Mill Bay Marine Group and the Pacific Gateway Marina in Port Renfrew for hosting the “Summer Chinook Shoot Out” August 19th & 20th where a portion of the proceeds go to help support the activities of the SFI. Also thanks to Gibbs Delta, Mercury Marine, Alpine Marine, Islander Reels, Reel West Coast, and a host of other sponsors for their support of the event. Tickets are still available so if you’re looking to have some fun, catch some fish and maybe win an awesome prize while supporting the good works of the Sport Fishing Institute and the Pacific Salmon Foundation, stop by and visit Pacific Gateway Marina, Mill Bay Marina, Sidney Marina, Island Outfitters or Alpine Marine to get your tickets!


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  7. Derby

    Derby Well-Known Member

    DFO Ground Fish Backgrounder

    Thank you to Shane Peterson, A/ Hook and Line Coordinator, Fisheries Management, DFO for providing this in depth description of how recreational and commercial ground fish fisheries are managed and monitored.

    Each season, DFO sets Total Allowable Catch (TAC) for species of commonly-caught groundfish (including rockfish) in BC; these TACs are based on stock assessments, surveys, DFO Science advice and are consulted on with stakeholders. TACs are then allocated between sectors (commercial, recreational, etc.), the commercial allotment for rockfish species is further divided for licence holders into Species Area Groupings (SAGs). Example: there is a commercial TAC for Yelloweye rockfish from Groundfish Management Areas 3C, 3D, 5A; this is effectively the amount of Yelloweye rockfish that can be caught by commercial licence holders for WCVI.

    Based on stock assessments and Science data, the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) may review depleted species for potential listing under the Species at Risk Act (SARA). The most relevant example is currently Yelloweye rockfish, which was listed as a species of special concern under SARA. In support of the Yelloweye rockfish rebuilding plan for the Outside population, there has been a 40% reduction in the commercial TAC for 2017/18 and a cumulative reduction of 81% since 2015/16. Information on the DFO approach to depleted species can be found in the front of the Groundfish Integrated Fisheries Management Plan (IFMP) in Section 8: Other Groundfish Management Issues (Page 32): http://waves-vagues.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/Library/40575159.pdf

    Commercial groundfish hook and line vessels are subject to 100% Electronic Monitoring at-sea, including video cameras which capture all fish brought on board as well as fish releases. Skippers are also required to maintain an accurate fishing log. As per their conditions of licence, the commercial groundfish hook and line vessels are required to retain all rockfish. Landed fish must be offloaded in the presence of and verified by an impartial observer as part of the Dockside Monitoring Program (DMP). The groundfish service provider, Archipelago Marine Research, reviews DMP and a portion of video data against the fishing log for each trip as part of the audit program. Skippers are required to achieve a high score for each trip on their audits, any audits that do not pass are sent to the Groundfish Management Unit (GMU) audit board for further investigation. Vessels are not allowed to hail out until their outstanding audits have been resolved.

    If a skipper is not able to provide adequate reasons for an outstanding audit, GMU may take additional compliance measures. Examples include the requirement for a review of 100% of video footage for the trip, the requirement to take an at-sea observer on subsequent trips (both at the expense of the licence holder) or additional legal investigation by our Groundfish Enforcement Coordinator. GMU takes all reports of non-compliance seriously, including reports of rockfish releases by commercial hook and line vessels. Should individuals observe any suspected fisheries violations we encourage them to contact the DFO Observe, Record and Report phone line at: 1-800-465-4336. Information on common occurrences and what to record can be found here: http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/fm-gp/rec/ORR-ONS-eng.html

    When vessels pass their trip audits, which occurs for the majority of hook and line trips, the weight of landed and discarded legal catch is deducted from the vessel’s current quota holdings for each quota-managed species. Should a vessel go into excess overage (i.e. negative quota) for any given species, they will be unable to hail out on another trip until that excess overage is addressed. Quota for a species may be obtained from other licences and GMU puts caps in place to ensure that sectors and individual licence holders do not monopolize quota for a given species and/or from a given area.



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    Operation Dry Water

    The SFI and the Canadian Safe Boating Council wish to remind boaters to be safe on the water and about the risks of drinking and boating. Visit Operation Dry Water for more information. Have fun on the water but don't drink and boat!



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    Fishing BC

    The Fishing BC program, a joint cooperative with FFSBC, BCFROA and the SFI, is underway and promoting all that’s good in BC when it comes to sport fishing. Expect more information through the late summer and fall regarding how you can be involved and take advantage of various promotional opportunities ranging from consumer show discounts, consumer show representation, social and traditional media and content generation. Visit FishingBC.com for an idea of what is being shared on the internet and across borders about fishing opportunities in BC. Or, be in touch with the SFI office for details and trade show co-op enrollment form.


    Until Next time – tight lines

    The SFI Team


    Check out the FishingBC app on IOS and watch for the Android version available soon!

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  8. Derby

    Derby Well-Known Member

    September 5, 2017



    We hope you had an opportunity to enjoy the unofficial end of summer this past weekend. As many get their kids back to school, get back to work or start to look towards fall plans, we wanted to touch on a few of the important issues that have emerged through the summer and that will have impacts for the coming year. It is already clear that the SFI team will be busy as ever this fall and winter and will be working hard to protect and promote opportunities for sport fishing in BC.

    Halibut 2017

    DFO has closed recreational halibut fishing for the 2017 season, as detailed in DFO fisheries notice, link here, issued September 4th for the closure at 23:59 on September 6th. As many of you know, our halibut fisheries are managed differently than other species of finfish recreational anglers harvest. To provide some context for comments to follow, we provide a few details regarding the recreational halibut fishery in BC. Since 2012, the recreational sector has been provided opportunity to harvest 15% of Canada’s negotiated annual Total Allowable Catch (TAC). 15% was established based on pressure from the recreational sector to increase the allocation percentage shared with commercial fisherman from an arbitrarily set 12% in 2007. The recreational sector spent a lot of time and energy to have DFO recognize the public’s right to reasonable access to a public resource, establish a viable allocation framework that would provide stable, predictable year-round opportunities for anglers and sustainable economic benefits for those who are employed in the public fishery and for the coast. DFO’s response was to increase the allocation from 12% to 15% in 2012. This was and continues to be inadequate to achieve the goal of maximizing the social and economic benefits created by what is clearly the most valuable use of the resource.

    The present formula provides 15% to recreational anglers and 85% of Canada’s halibut TAC to 435 commercial quota holders, many of whom don’t fish halibut themselves but lease the quota that they own and received for free. From the moment that the recreational halibut allocation was set it was clear that it was not adequate to allow for a reliable and full season for recreational anglers based on historic, and reasonable bag and possession limits. To salvage opportunity, management measures were proposed by the SFAB Halibut working group to slow harvest in order to provide for a reliable and full season. Those measures recommended included reducing the daily bag and possession limits, the size of halibut retained, and implementing an annual limit. Sizes have been adjusted over the years in an attempt to maximize opportunity and to ensure a full season. While this has been successful, it resulted in the recreational sector leaving over 500,000 lbs. of uncaught halibut in the water over the last few years.

    As it is every year, the 2017 TAC was set in February at the International Pacific Halibut Commission meetings. Halibut are a well managed species, and catch numbers on the Pacific coast are well understood. Halibut stocks appear to be healthy in BC waters, and, as a result, Canada enjoyed a slight increase in its annual TAC in 2016 and 2017. This should mean an increase in halibut available to recreational anglers or at least the same opportunity they had the year before, right? Not so fast, although the management measures that were put in place in 2012 and adjusted each year since have left over a half million pounds of halibut in the water, there have been changes and additions made to how recreational catch is estimated. Because of this, in 2017 DFO has chosen to close the fishery with only partial information and at a time when if there had been a significant overage, it has already occurred. Post Labour Day recreational catch of halibut is much lower than the busy summer months due to work and school schedules and because of changing weather. While it is understood that DFO must forecast estimates based on previous years and trends in season, DFO staff has explained that of the 2017 forecast scenarios modelled, one projected 15,000 lbs. under our TAC by the end of August, others were over the recreational TAC and, the worst scenario, which includes unaddressed data anomalies and inconsistencies, showed an overage of 100,000 lbs. by the end of December. Considering the 2017 Canadian TAC is over 7.45 million lbs. and the recreational fishery has saved over 500,000 lbs. in the last several years, a closure based on projected overages that ranged from 15,000 lbs. under the recreational TAC to a flawed, worst-case estimate of 100,000 lbs. over (8.5% over the recreational TAC or 1.4% over Canada’s TAC if all halibut were harvested in 2017), shows an incredible lack of consideration of all factors involved, and complete disregard for the importance of the recreational fishery to small coastal communities from Prince Rupert to Sooke. The impact to small business, communities, and individuals is more damaging than any potential overage. It is also important to note that the commercial sector, as of August 29th, had 2.45 million pounds of quota in the water and SE Alaska charter fisheries will regularly surpass their TAC allowances by 200K to 300K pounds. To be clear, we are not trying to suggest that consistent overages of this scale are acceptable, but what these numbers do illustrate is the IPHC context under which we negotiate the TAC, and that the State of Alaska has a much greater appreciation for the stability of the significant number of middle class jobs created by the fishery in its jurisdiction than does the government of Canada. Alaska seems willing and able to balance the negligible political and insignificant conservation risks associated with maintaining the fishery and with the devastating and long term social and economic impacts associated with an in-season closure. Clearly, our government isn’t.

    It is with these best guess predictions and the background of the details above, that DFO has chosen to close recreational halibut fishing. It is a damaging and costly example of how commercially biased DFO is and how inconsiderate they are of the needs of the recreational sector. The implications of the closure extend well beyond the end of 2017 and will potentially impact opportunities for small communities and business for years to come. Visitors planning trips in the fall will be, once again, reluctant or will decline booking when opportunity is uncertain.

    It is important to note that we are not talking about any kind of a conservation related issue here, this is strictly about a flawed and biased allocation policy, and the stubborn insistence of DFO to choose an overly conservative approach to management of the recreational fishery despite different approaches taken by other jurisdictions in the Pacific Northwest, and the flawed data assumptions regarding 2016 and 2017 catch in the recreational fleet. As previously mentioned, halibut in BC waters are not in a state of conservation concern, the stock is in an increasing cycle, and average sizes of halibut are increasing. The conservation risk of keeping the recreational fishery open with the realistic potential of being over our TAC by even 9% is virtually incalculable, and falls within the margin of error in any data sets used. The impact to small business and middle-class jobs in coastal communities in BC will be harsh, and long term. This isn’t science based or even evidence based decision making, this is all about allocation politics, and the desire to have bureaucrats feel good about being able to say, “we are under our TAC” – regardless of the cost to our citizens!

    Unfortunately, this ill-considered decision will undoubtedly reignite the allocation debate and discussion; how is it that DFO can allow 435 quota holders (many of whom received their quota for free because they fished halibut in the early 1990’s) to possess 85% of halibut in the water? Most quota holders don’t fish, they lease to commercial fisherman who must sell halibut to the highest bidder (which means more than 70% of commercially caught BC halibut is exported) to make profit themselves. The 300,000 recreational anglers with access to just 15% of halibut, keep more than $600 million of annual spending in our province, yet its fishery is forced to close due to a potential overage so small it is difficult to measure accurately.

    While the argument to secure additional quota for the recreational sector had been dormant for many years, this decision by DFO is clearly a call to action for our sector. It is unfair and discriminatory to recreational anglers and the public that DFO is now making a decision that has no impact on conservation of halibut yet needlessly affects small businesses, communities, individual livelihoods and rights to public property.
     
  9. Derby

    Derby Well-Known Member

    Experimental Licence Program

    You may note that there are details in the DFO notice referring to an experimental licence program (XRQ). The XRQ purports to provide an opportunity for recreational harvesters to retain halibut beyond the halibut fishery closure date under the BC Tidal Waters Sport Fishing Licence by acquiring halibut quota from the commercial fishery. While this may seem like a tempting option, particularly for businesses and individuals that would like to harvest halibut during the fall months, it is another example of how DFO does not understand the importance of expectation, opportunity, and stability for the recreational sector.

    The XRQ is reprehensible in that it serves to drive a wedge between the angling public, whom have a right of access to a public property resource, and opportunists who, many without understanding the implications, are willing to pay to lease an opportunity for something that should be free. The net result is a two-tiered system of access to a common property resource. We feel this flies in the face of the ethics and of our sport in that it places a value per pound on halibut and thereby commercializes the activity. It also sets a dangerous precedent for expansion to other species and fisheries. The lack of enforcement and tracking of catch in this program is unacceptable and has created a significant loop hole for those who would exploit the resource illegally for their own personal gain. Our fisheries are a public property resources and should be available to one and all, the experimental licence plays into the idea that halibut swimming in the ocean can be owned at the exclusion of others. Bottom line, avoid the experimental licence and encourage others to as well The XRQ is not a solution to our current problem. Whether it is through increasing our allocation or allowing a reasonable degree of flexibility over time in terms of fishing under our TAC, something significant needs to change to provide the certainty and stability in the fishery that DFO claims is a goal of its management practices.

    As mentioned at the outset, the SFI will be busy this off season working on a variety of issues including halibut allocation and will continue to strive for reliable opportunities and a full season. We also encourage you to register your concerns with DFO at whichever level you would like. If feedback can be provided to all levels of DFO and to local MLA’s or MP’s perhaps we can convince DFO to finally make changes that are needed and overdue.

    Fraser River Opportunities and Fish FarmsWhile the halibut closure is bad enough, unfortunately, we find that there are other threats to opportunity and resources;

    Fraser River Opportunities
    We note that the Fraser Valley Sportfishing Alliance held a demonstration fishery over the weekend to show that selective fishing techniques are effective to entirely avoid a species of concern. It is our hope that there will be meaningful dialogue with all stakeholders and DFO this off season to develop a strategy to permit selective opportunity for one species when there are other species in river that must be conserved.

    Fish Farms
    The recent escape of hundreds of thousands of Atlantic salmon from a net pen in the Juan de Fuca Strait and their appearance as far north and west as Tofino will have unknown impacts on our waters and wild fish. And, although this accident happened across the border it should be used as powerful example of why fish farms in our waters must follow precautionary principles and move to land based facilities or to closed containment. While it is understood that there is considerable expense in adaptation to closed containment, the risk and potential cost to our environment and our wild salmon stocks is far greater. It is encouraging that DFO and the Federal Government have invested nearly 3 billion dollars to our oceans, fisheries management, and infrastructure. Perhaps a portion of that should be directed towards capital investment in fish farms so the move to closed containment can be expedited. The risks and uncertainty to our wild salmon stocks and environment are too great to simply wait and see. The escape south of the border should serve as a real reminder of this.

    Share and voice your opinion

    We encourage you to let your opinion be known on this and the issues in this update now and often – please feel free to send us comments, we’ll collect and forward feedback received or better yet, write directly to your local MP, MLA or DFO official.


    Until Next time – tight lines

    The SFI Team


    Check out the FishingBC app on IOS and watch for the Android version available soon!

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  10. Derby

    Derby Well-Known Member

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    2017 Annual Policy Conference


    On November 23rd the SFI will be holding its annual Industry Policy Conference in Vancouver at the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver. This event is a key forum where officials, public servants and those in and interested in the sport fishing industry can meet, share their perspectives on the issues facing the recreational fishery and, receive updates on preliminary expectations for the forthcoming season.

    Our half day format will begin with lunch at 11:30am and ends just in time for the Big Splash Gala Fundraiser that evening.

    We have an exciting list of speakers on a variety of subjects within our theme this year; Sharing Knowledge.

    For more information, or to purchase your Early Bird Ticket contact our office at (250) 591-0734 or (604) 946-0734 or email us at info@sportfishing.bc.ca. You can also purchase your tickets online by CLICKING HERE!


    2017 Bob Wright Legacy Award


    The Sport Fishing Institute of BC has developed the Bob Wright Legacy Award (BWLA) to honour individuals and organizations for their contribution to the conservation, restoration and enhancement of BC’s recreational fishing industry and fishery. These individuals or organizations have played, and continue to play, a crucial role in sustaining and developing the recreational fishing experience in BC.

    We would like to hear about people or organizations that have helped conserve, protect and/or develop British Columbia’s recreational fishing industry and community in an exceptional way.

    If you would like to nominate an individual or organization, please fill out the simple nomination form by CLICKING HERE.

    Nomination deadline is October 16th, 2017.




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    Early Bird Tickets

    Early Bird tickets are on sale now but only for a limited time! Come and join us for a night of great food, greats friends and great fun! To purchase your early bird tickets at a discounted price contact us or CLICK HERE!

    Location & Accommodation
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    November 23rd at The Fairmont Hotel Vancouver

    Please join us on Thursday, November 23rd, 2017 downtown at the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver.

    We have a limited number of rooms blocked for our event at a special rate of $189 per night. To reserve your room, please contact the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver directly at (604) 684.3131 and quote 1117BIGS_002 on or before October 23, 2017.


    Donation Requests


    The Sport Fishing Institute of BC is a non-profit organization established in 1980 and is dedicated to promoting, enhancing and protecting sustainable sport fishing opportunities in BC. Our vision is to have British Columbia sport fishing known as a world leader in quality of experience and opportunity, providing the broadest range of social and economic benefits.

    The key to the continued success of the event and organization is the generosity of the many businesses and individuals who donate.

    Why Donate to the SFI and the Big Splash?

    • Support a cause that directly impacts your business and opportunities on the water. We work hard year round to ensure that our fisheries will continue to benefit BC communities and businesses now and for generations to come.
    • Great networking exposure; the Big Splash has become an anticipated and successful event, welcoming business owners, managers and a variety of interests who are keen to support sustainable sport fishing opportunities in British Columbia.
    • Great business exposure; we will advertise your business or contribution leading up to and at the event through our social media platforms, website and widely distributed member updates.
    If you would like to donate to our 2017 Big Splash Gala Fundraiser, please contact Cathy at (250) 591-0734 or (604) 946-0734 or email our office at info@sportfishing.bc.ca. Deadline for receiving donations is November 1st!

    Until next time, Tight Lines!

    Sport Fishing Institute of BC Team










    THANK YOU SPONSORS
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  11. Derby

    Derby Well-Known Member

    [​IMG]

    2017 Annual Policy Conference


    On November 23rd the SFI will be holding its annual Industry Policy Conference in Vancouver at the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver. This event is a key forum where officials, public servants and those in and interested in the sport fishing industry can meet, share their perspectives on the issues facing the recreational fishery and, receive updates on preliminary expectations for the forthcoming season.

    Our half day format will begin with lunch at 11:30am and ends just in time for the Big Splash Gala Fundraiser that evening.

    Updates on SFI activities, reports from DFO and details about Fishing BC are included as are many more speakers and a variety of subjects within our theme this year; Sharing Knowledge.

    For more information, or to purchase your tickets please contact our office at (250) 591-0734 or (604) 946-0734 or email us at info@sportfishing.bc.ca. You can also purchase your tickets online by CLICKING HERE!





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    Location & Accommodation
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    November 23rd at The Fairmont Hotel Vancouver

    Please join us on Thursday, November 23rd, 2017 downtown at the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver.

    We have a limited number of rooms blocked for our event at a special rate of $189 per night. To reserve your room, please contact the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver directly at (604) 684.3131 and quote 1117BIGS_002 on or before October 23, 2017.


    Donation Requests

    The Sport Fishing Institute of BC is a non-profit organization established in 1980 and is dedicated to promoting, enhancing and protecting sustainable sport fishing opportunities in BC. Our vision is to have British Columbia sport fishing known as a world leader in quality of experience and opportunity, providing the broadest range of social and economic benefits.

    The key to the continued success of the event and organization is the generosity of the many businesses and individuals who donate.

    Why Donate to the SFI?

    • Support a cause that directly impacts your business and opportunities on the water. We work hard year round to ensure that our fisheries will continue to benefit BC communities and businesses now and for generations to come.
    • Great networking exposure; the Big Splash has become an anticipated and successful event, welcoming business owners, managers and a variety of interests who are keen to support sustainable sport fishing opportunities in British Columbia.
    • Great business exposure; we will advertise your business or contribution leading up to and at the event through our social media platforms, website and widely distributed member updates.
    If you would like to donate to our 2017 Big Splash Gala Fundraiser, please contact us at (250) 591-0734 or (604) 946-0734 or email our office at info@sportfishing.bc.ca. Deadline for receiving donations is November 1st!

    Until next time, Tight Lines!

    Sport Fishing Institute of BC Team










    THANK YOU SPONSORS
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  12. Derby

    Derby Well-Known Member

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    ANNUAL CONFERENCE & BIG SPLASH - November 23


    2017 SFI Conference: Sharing Knowledge


    On November 23rd the SFI will be holding its annual Industry Policy Conference in Vancouver at the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver. This event is a key forum where officials, public servants and those in and interested in the sport fishing industry can meet, share their perspectives on the issues facing the recreational fishery and, receive updates on preliminary expectations for the forthcoming season.

    Our half day format will begin with lunch at 11:30am and ends just in time for the Big Splash Gala Fundraiser.

    Full Agenda - Click Here
    Speakers include:

    • Rob Alcock, Sport Fishing Institute and Gibbs Delta Tackle
    • Fisheries and Oceans Senior Scientists and Officials
    • Dr. Brian Riddell, Pacific Salmon Foundation
    • Dr. Gerry Kristianson, Sport Fishing Advisory Board
    • Jody Young, Destination BC
    • Transport Canada and Port of Vancouver
    • Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC
    • Al Martin, BC Wildlife Federation
    • Matt Jennings, BC Fishing Resort and Outfitters Association and Fishing BC
    • Dr. Neil McLean, Executive Air Ambulance
    • Dave Barrett, Monitoring and Compliance Panel
    • Nick Chowdhury, Island Marine Aquatic Working Group
    For more information, or to purchase your tickets please contact our office at (250) 591-0734 or (604) 946-0734 or email us at info@sportfishing.bc.ca.

    Purchase your TICKETS HERE.


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  13. Derby

    Derby Well-Known Member

    2017 Big Splash Gala Fundraiser

    Doors open at 5:30 p.m. to BC's sport fishing community social event of the year. A new location this year, the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver, but, as usual, watch for a tremendous collection of unique and desirable goodies, trips, and services to bid on and raffles to win.


    Live Auction Preview

    You won’t want to miss an opportunity to bid on our amazing live auction items. For the first time, we are starting one of our auctions online and well ahead of time. The reason: its a one-of-a-kind experience, an Aurora Tour with Air North that leaves from YVR on the morning of November 24th. You can also bid on 2018 getaways to Langara Fishing Lodge, Shearwater Resort, or a trip with SFI President, Rob Alcock, and Reel West host, Brendan Morrison. Also for your consideration, a private suite for 14 people at Rogers Arena to the upcoming Harry Styles Concert and an inflatable boat and much more.

    AURORA BOREALIS TOUR
    Pack your bags and get ready as your incredible experience starts with a one-night stay at the Fairmont Vancouver Airport Hotel the evening of the Big Splash, November 23rd, then be whisked off on the morning of November 24th to the vast wilderness of the Yukon. Your two-night stay at the Edgewater Hotel in Whitehorse includes a welcome reception at the Kwanlin Dunn Cultural Center before boarding your Air North charter flight to see the Aurora Borealis from the air! For the first time ever in Canada, this one-of-a-kind experience will offer spectacular and unmatched views of high altitude aurora at 36,000 feet.


    LANGARA FISHING LODGE TRIP – HAIDA GWAII
    An all-inclusive trip for two to Langara Fishing Lodge in Haida Gwaii. Package includes: four or five-day trip to Langara Fishing Lodge for two people in 2018. Return air travel from Vancouver to Haida Gwaii and helicopter flights into the lodge. Accommodations and all meals, including alcohol with meals. All necessary fishing equipment and marine clothing. Private unguided 19’ console boat (guided fishing is available as an option). Care of your catch, including vacuum-packing and flash-freezing.

    OCEAN HOUSE GETAWAY
    Discover the edge of the world with this trip for two to West Coast Resorts newest resort, Ocean House, opening in 2018. Discover the beauty and tranquility of this magical place in Haida Gwaii. This all-inclusive trip is for 3 nights valid Sunday through Wednesday. Donated by: West Coast Resorts

    HARRY STYLES - IN STYLE
    Win a suite at GM Place for you and 13 of your closest friends to see Harry Styles on July 6th, 2018. Package includes 14 tickets to a 200-level suite plus underground parking for two vehicles. Donated by: Duncanby Lodge

    SHEARWATER RESORT
    Your choice of either a four or five-day fishing trip for two people in May, June, or September 2018. Package includes return airfare from Richmond to Bella Bella and transfers to Shearwater, accommodation, all meals, boat usage, fishing equipment and fish processing. This is an unguided trip, but guiding can be purchased ahead of time subject to availability.

    MERCURY INFLATABLE SPORT BOAT AND MOTOR
    Jump in and get going in your brand-new Mercury 310 inflatable sport boat! This Mercury sport boat is built for cruising, family fun and ship to shore! This boat comes complete with a Mercury 6hp 4 stroke motor which is light but powerful making it easy to lift and carry, but capable of maneuvering even in shallow water. Get out and have fun! Donated by: Bridgeview Marine & Mercury Marine

    WALTERS COVE RESORT – MARINERS PACKAGE
    This three-night trip for two to Walters Cove Resort includes accommodations at the lodge and use of all lodge amenities, all meals and snacks including wine with dinner, fishing processing, moorage, and ice! This trip is perfect for the person who likes to BYOB, bring your own boat, and fish Kyuquot.

    PORT HARDY ADVENTURE!
    A Tides and Tales Sport Fishing Adventures 8-hr full day fishing charter out of Port Hardy with two-nights accommodation, fish processing and return flights from Vancouver with Pacific Coastal Airlines.

    A DANCING BEAR
    10” soapstone dancing bear carved by Valencia Bird.

    FINS & SKINS
    A half-day charter with Island Outfitters leaving Victoria Harbour followed by, or following a day on the links at Westin Bear Mountain Golf Resort & Spa. Return flights from Vancouver provided by Harbour Air and an overnight at the Westin Bear Mountain Resort.

    REAL FISHING WITH REEL WEST COAST & GIBBS DELTA TACKLE
    You and a guest will join The Reel West Coast host, Brendan Morrison, and SFI President, Rob Alcock, for a day of fishing aboard the custom-built Tackle Box boat.



    Big Splash Tickets


    Tickets are on sale now and selling quickly. Get your tickets soon before it's too late. Ticket sales end Monday November 20th and are NOT available at the door!

    **Please let us know if you or any of your guest have any food allergies or require a vegetarian meal by no later than Monday November 20th.


    Until next time, Tight Lines!

    Sport Fishing Institute of BC Team
     
  14. Derby

    Derby Well-Known Member

    November 30, 2017



    Post Conference and Big Splash

    Last Thursday, more than 125 interested anglers, guides, lodge operators and, representatives from a variety of businesses converged on the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver for the annual sport fishing industry policy conference. Attendees heard presentations on topics including a preliminary 2018 salmon outlook, on catch monitoring, First Nations’ perspectives on working and sharing knowledge about our respective fisheries, details about Southern Resident Killer Whale health as it relates to Chinook stocks, updates on halibut, and plans to communicate regarding Yelloweye Rockfish.

    Thank you to everyone who joined us at the annual SFI Conference.

    To learn more, you can read most of the conference presentations here. And, we premiered a short video, “What is the SFI?”, narrated by hockey great Dave Babych, and produced for us by Northwest Creative. Visit the News section of the SFI site to take a look.

    Following the conference, more than 225 people enjoyed an evening of food, drink, and auctions at the Big Splash gala fundraiser. While we changed up the format a bit this year, we had a great space for the evening’s event and participation was outstanding.

    Thanks again to all those who came out and supported the SFI.

    Fish Farming

    With respect to sport fishing issues, it is worth noting a recent story by CTV (linked here) and making the rounds on social media, that depicts significant concerns and risks to our fish and fisheries as a result of processing fish farm salmon.

    We will take this opportunity to encourage you to submit feedback to DFO to urge that, at the very least, they adopt the precautionary principle when it comes to assessing fish farm and related activities in open waters. The precautionary principle, which should halt any questionable or potentially damaging practices, is employed for different fisheries and in many situations when DFO makes management decisions. However, and inexplicably so, where there is much at stake and evidence to suggest that harm is very likely occurring due to open net pen practices, this principle is ignored. Why is that? Wild salmon stocks and juvenile salmon must be protected; whether it be for the longevity and sustainability of the species or to help in the recovery of Southern Resident Killer Whales, strong and healthy populations of salmon in our oceans must be our collective objective.

    Check out the SFI website, Issues section, to see recently posted links to information and the CTV story. We will post any new information as it comes available.

    Southern Resident Killer Whales
    We’ve also added a section on Southern Resident Killer Whales in the Issues section of the SFI website. This is an important issue and one which the recreational fishing community will likely play an important role in activities that will help lead to recovery of SRKW. Our community is well-suited to respond and should be prepared to be an active participant in meaningful and productive changes.

    CTAG
    We also want to remind guides and lodge operators that the CTAG challenge program is available. Those who complete enrollment before the New Year will be able to receive their tax training credit of 1,000.00 at tax time in 2018 (aside from other promotional and cost saving benefits!). Experienced guides who meet all requirements of the CTAG program are encouraged to take advantage of the program and get their certification before the new year or this winter. Check in with the SFI with questions, enroll online and go to any Service BC office to complete the challenge.

    Until Next time – tight lines

    The SFI Team


    Check out the FishingBC app on IOS and Android!

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    bigdogeh and GLG like this.
  15. getbent

    getbent Well-Known Member

    Thanks for the update Big Square!
    Good job!!!
     
  16. Derby

    Derby Well-Known Member

    hey o_O I resemble that comment :p
     
  17. Derby

    Derby Well-Known Member

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