Guiding in August

Discussion in 'Saltwater Fishing Forum' started by ronj, Jan 15, 2018.

  1. ronj

    ronj Active Member

    Hello All...
    First off... I have been a VERY active fisherman in Sooke over the last few years.... loading up on Salmon and Hali... and eventually... will retire out there. (Not just yet)
    That being said... I have a very good boat and set up... and was thinking about guiding once I get there.
    In the meantime, I think I want to start guiding part time only. I am looking to guide for most of August only this year. (I can take the month off work).
    I have emailed many regulatory bodies to make sure that I can do this legit... but have not received and direct answers... but it does look like I can guide legally under another registered guide?
    Any suggestions? Or any guides out there that would be interested in having someone under them in the hot month of August for Spring Salmon....? I know a lot of the guides at Sooke Harbour Resort... but thought I should look here for advice first.
    Thanks!
     
  2. scott craven

    scott craven Well-Known Member

    You may want to wait and see if we have a Chinook fishery this year ?
    timing likely isn't the best.
     
    getbent likes this.
  3. tubber

    tubber Well-Known Member

    Good luck. You are a brave person. You can always try HMV, Blockbuster, or Fotomat if guiding doesn't pan out.
     
    getbent and Rain City like this.
  4. ronj

    ronj Active Member

    Not sure exactly what you mean by that... not doing it for the money.... I love fishing... and love showing people what its all about.
     
    ILHG likes this.
  5. scott craven

    scott craven Well-Known Member

    I think he's referring to the uncertainty in the guiding industry due to potential added restrictions.
     
  6. tubber

    tubber Well-Known Member

    Sorry ronj, that's just me being a jackass. Good luck. I hope this works out for you.
    Regardless of whether further restrictions happen or not, I don't see fishing as a growth industry at the moment. That doesn't mean existing guides can't continue to do what they do successfully. I'm certainly playing the waiting game to not only book this summer's trips, but also I'll be waiting to buy a bigger boat, and definitely going to wait and see as far as retiring to the Island goes.
     
  7. trophywife

    trophywife Well-Known Member

    get your SVOP, get your boat TC approved, get minimum 3 million liability insurance if you plan on turning over any recorded money transactions!!
     
    Derby likes this.
  8. ronj

    ronj Active Member

    thanks for the tips... insurance and TC approved is done..... look into SVOP right away. even if I don't.. .might as well have it.
     
  9. aheny

    aheny Well-Known Member

    I found the whole process to be relatively painless, TC makes everything very clear. It's nice to be set up an legal, even if you chose not to carry many passengers each year, at least you have the option.
    Very handy when dealing with professional clients and associates.

    I did find it odd that the actual act of guiding salt water salmon fishing is not regulated in Canada, you are more or less a ferry or water taxi as far as they are concerned. CTAG seems like a decent club to join, its nice to add some type of standards to what you are doing, even if it isnt regulated.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2018
    Derby and Dogbreath like this.
  10. ronj

    ronj Active Member

    interesting..... if you go ahead and run an ad and do it "illegally".... you can be punished.... yet I have been asking Government bodies for months about what I need to do to be legit..... and I have more info in 24 hrs from this forum than from the government....
    I will be trying to obtain all I need to be legit for sure.... SVOP appears to be the next stop.
    Thanks all.
     
    trophywife likes this.
  11. profisher

    profisher Well-Known Member

    You first need to register your boat as a commercial vessel which changes your registration number form a 14k or BC number to a C number. Then you need SVOP, MED (Marine Emergency Duties), Marine First Aid, Radio Operators Licence and then are required to have your vessel approved with TC including a stability test...they will limit you on how many passengers and offshore operating limits based on your boats performance/stability limitations. You must also carry liability insurance, min 300,000 per person carried. You must then equip your boat with the required TC gear for its size. All the required courses are one time except first aid which must be done every 5 years if you take the marine version, otherwise every 3 years if you opt for just first aid. TC won't give you a window decal until you have all your ducks in a row.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2018
    Derby likes this.
  12. nicnat

    nicnat Active Member

    you should have or will need svop, med a 3, roc, and should have a valid marine first aid ticket. if you have none of these you should look at doing the ctag program
    http://sportfishing.bc.ca/ctag/
     
  13. searun

    searun Well-Known Member

    Excellent advice, follow Profisher's list exactly and you will be all set. The courses listed there will take you a total of 7 days in class training. When completing your Small Commercial Vessel safety inspections (download the inspection book from their website), you will also need to complete a vessel stability test, which is required before TC will give you an operating certificate. If you haven't completed one, it may be an idea to hire one of the marine surveyors, or depending on year of your boat the manufacturer may have been required to produce one.

    BTW, your Blue Decal inspection renewal is required only every 5 years, however you must complete a vessel safety inspection recording that (copy on vessel) every season. They just implemented a new process for renewals, which is an on-line process and far, far simpler than the old one. I was done in no time.

    Getting the "C" numbers is one small step, the rest is to complete the safety inspection process, and then modify your vessel to comply. In some cases the manufacturer's original specs do not comply. For example, all thru hull fittings near or below the waterline are required to have sea cock shut offs installed to stop water ingress. Similarly, you will need to independently wire a fuse box to power your down riggers, to provide separate power up off the battery - can't wire direct to your battery. A very good idea because I personally know of 4 boat fires from Scotty riggers. Sorry to dive in to details, but thinking a couple of examples would help point you in the right direction.

    There are lots of guys who have gone through the entire process - I'm sure if you are buds with a few of your local guides, they can offer solid advice to help you through it. If you can find someone who has the same vessel as you, it would be very worthwhile to connect with them to find out what modifications they needed to make, vessel stability etc.

    Someone mentioned CTAG - excellent program, definitely recommend it (not to mention the $1,000 tax incentive once completed). The intent of all these regulations, training, and vessel preparation is to ensure your customer's have a safe enjoyable experience.

    Hope this helps, good luck.
     
    BearCove and Derby like this.
  14. aheny

    aheny Well-Known Member

    I think the main issue with asking the civil servants to answer questions, is they don't want to stick their neck out. If they don't phrase it exactly as its written, its possible they could misinform you, or something along those lines. Sometimes you will find a guy who will speak to you informally, but not always. I found the guy who was in charge of self inspection at TC to be the most helpful during the initial setup process (changing to brass thru-hulls, fire suppression/detection, helm indicator lights, stability assessment, etc)
     
  15. Twinstrike

    Twinstrike Member

    Profisher is bang on. As a lodge that hires independent guides to work Nootka Sound I require pretty much everything profisher alluded to. Good luck with your endeavors.
     
  16. uclueletcharters

    uclueletcharters Well-Known Member

    Regarding downrigger power supply and fuse box easiest way and I think most boats have them is to have an inline 30 amp fuse on your hot wire a couple inches away from the direct connect to your battery. Fire hazard solved no expensive separate fuse panel required :)
     
  17. profisher

    profisher Well-Known Member

    I have a positive stainless post which is wired up the master switch. All 3 downrigger positive wires are attached to this post and from there each doqnrigger has its own 25 amp fuse in a watertight blade type fuse holder. All 3 positive wires are short in length and heavy guage. The fuse holders I located in one of my battery compartments which allow for quick access and is a dry location as well.
     
    searun likes this.
  18. searun

    searun Well-Known Member

    Precisely what TC asks for - other methods using fuses between the battery and rigger were not being approved back in the old days when the yellow sticker program existed and TC actually inspected your vessel. Its easy, but not approved...and there is a reason. I have same system as Profisher, with one additional modification. Worth the convenience factor as you gain quick access for changing the fuse should there be an issue. I went one additional step and put in re-settable fuses between the post and battery so I can actually cut off the power to the riggers when not in use, while maintaining electrical supply to other vessel functions. Again, after watching electrical fires happen to 4 other buddies boats I'm not taking chances with those Scotty riggers.
     
    Derby likes this.
  19. profisher

    profisher Well-Known Member

    Searun, the only reason I went one time blade type fuses is because I was told by the electronic guys that the reset type switches respond slow to a short or overload where as the blade type are instant. In the case of sounders, radios and the like the reset type likely will not cut the circuit fast enough to prevent damage to the device. You do have to be more careful when pulling up a kelp raft of when on bottom not to overload the 25amp fuse as they do blow quick once you do exceed that amperage.
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2018
    trophywife likes this.
  20. searun

    searun Well-Known Member

    Great point on using the re-settables as your primary fuse - totally agree. In my application the bladed fuse block is between the resettable unit and the rigger. I essentially have 2 sets of fuses. The resettable is only there so I can independently turn off power to the fuse panel and riggers. I suppose the cheaper alternative would have been to simply install a switch, but I sort of fell for the double protection pitch my marine wiring guy was making.

    My reason for doing that is 2 buddies have had fires while running out to fishing grounds with the riggers powered up, 1 had a fire at the dock (was luckily there at time), and another had his boat burn up - it was a total loss unfortunately. Beauty Tiara up in smoke sadly. So after that I became more than a little paranoid.
     

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