Franklin Expedition search: Ice dive team ready to discover more secrets of HMS Erebu

Discussion in 'Conservation, Fishery Politics and Management.' started by agentaqua, Apr 6, 2015.

  1. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/frank...discover-more-secrets-of-hms-erebus-1.3020860

    Franklin Expedition search: Ice dive team ready to discover more secrets of HMS Erebus
    Parks Canada underwater archeologists and Royal Canadian Navy divers join up to explore Nunavut site
    By Janet Davison, CBC News Posted: Apr 06, 2015 5:00 AM ET| Last Updated: Apr 06, 2015 11:12 AM ET

    Parks Canada and Royal Canadian Navy divers prepare for an icy plunge during a training exercise near Quebec City last month. The dive took place before a mission to an undisclosed spot on the Arctic sea ice - planned for early April - beneath which the HMS Erebus, part of Sir John Franklin’s doomed expedition, has been for nearly 170 years.

    Spring, when the ice is thickest, makes for the best time to dive to the Erebus, senior Parks Canada archeologist and underwater specialist Ryan Harris says. Training exercises, which took place from March 2-6 in the St. Lawrence River, were held ahead of the Arctic expedition.

    The ice in Queen Maud Gulf, off Nunavut, will also be home to a team of 32 Parks Canada and navy team members, who will be camping near the dive site over a 10-day period.

    During the training sessions, Parks Canada underwater archeologists familiarized themselves with the navy's ice diving equipment and safety protocols while navy members learned about underwater archeology techniques. Here, a navy operator checks a decompression unit during a test dive in Quebec.

    Once in the water, the divers verify each other’s suit for leaks before dipping below the surface, where they can stay in the -2 C water for over an hour, Bernier says.

    Parks Canada and Royal Canadian Navy divers prepare for an icy plunge during a training exercise near Quebec City last month. The dive took place before a mission to an undisclosed spot on the Arctic sea ice - planned for early April - beneath which the HMS Erebus, part of Sir John Franklin’s doomed expedition, has been for nearly 170 years. (Parks Canada)

    Nearly 170 years after the crushing forces of Arctic ice helped doom Sir John Franklin's quest for the Northwest Passage, there is more than a little irony in the fact that deep sea ice is about to provide new opportunities to delve into the mysteries of the expedition's fate.

    Ice two metres thick will form the platform from which Parks Canada underwater archeologists and Royal Canadian Navy divers will launch an unprecedented exploration of the wreck of HMS Erebus this week.

    ...continued...
     
  2. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

    The Nature of Things: Franklin's Lost Ships

    This week's episode of The Nature of Things on Thursday at 8 p.m. on CBC-TV uses CGI, re-enactments and a good old-fashioned adventure yarn to lay out how Sir John Franklin's expedition became the worst disaster in polar exploration history.

    The ice dive comes seven months after the converted British bombing vessel that was one half of the Franklin Expedition was discovered remarkably intact at the bottom of Queen Maud Gulf off Nunavut.

    "With ice cover, there will be no wave action," says Ryan Harris, a senior underwater archeologist for Parks Canada.

    "Without the waves stirring up the seas, all the particulate settles down to the sea floor and it creates fairly ideal clarity conditions. It's almost like diving in an aquarium."

    And that's particularly good for the new high-tech, 3D laser scanning tool that will be deployed as archeologists try to create the most detailed images possible of the wreck lying about 11 metres below the surface.

    ■The Franklin story: Learn about the doomed expedition
    ■Franklin ship found in Arctic ID'd as HMS Erebus
    ■​Franklin ship discovery just the 'beginning'

    "We want to take advantage of the water clarity to do a very thorough baseline recording of the wreck site before any future interventions take place," says Harris.

    Winter camping

    The ice cover also provides a base for the camp that will house the 32 members of the combined Parks Canada and navy dive team who have trained together for the operation, becoming familiar with each other's equipment and techniques.

    "This ice now is providing that stable platform where we can live," says navy Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class Larry Lyver.

    Franklin expedition underwater inspection
    A Parks Canada diver measures part of the Franklin expedition's Erebus on Sept 18, 2014. (Thierry Boyer/Parks Canada)

    "There's no up and down. There's no motion. Short of the confined space we're going through, this is the most stable and safe platform that we can use to conduct this operation."

    Access to the wreck will come through three triangular holes bored through the ice — each side of each triangle will be about two metres long.

    Needless to say, deciding where to drill those holes is key, and will be guided by sonar data already collected.

    "We'll go back with survey grade GPS mapping equipment and we'll make sure we're putting these holes precisely where we want them," says Harris, noting the desire for accuracy so that access is as easy as possible for the divers and the umbilicals providing continuous air from the surface.

    He's thinking of one hole on the port side of Erebus, another on starboard and one near the stern.

    Plans at this point aim for 14-hour dive days — beginning around 8 a.m. and going until 10 p.m. over a 10-day period starting Thursday or Friday.

    Chilly water

    Two-person dive teams will be deployed in steady succession — each team will include one Parks Canada member and one navy member. The chilly –2 or –3 C water becomes a key factor determining how long divers stay down.

    "We can be in the water for more than an hour; we're dressed for it," Marc-André Bernier, the head of the Parks Canada underwater archeology team, told a technical briefing last month.

    Parks Canada underwater archeologists have been conducting dives at the site of the wreck since the discovery was made. At the start of the third dive on the site, senior underwater archeologiest Ryan Harris lowers the HD video camera system to teammate Marc-Andre Bernier, who waits in the water at lower left.

    The wrecked Franklin expedition ship found last month in the Arctic has been identified as HMS Erebus. Here, underwater archaeologist Filippo Ronca measures part of the Franklin expedition's Erebus on Sept 18, 2014.

    Survey vessels steaming in formation at the conclusion of the project: hydrographic survey launches Gannet and Kinglett, at left and far right, CCGS Sir Wilfrid Laurier at rear, and Parks Canada RV Investigator, foreground.

    Two ships, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, were part of Sir John Franklin's doomed expedition in 1845 to find the Northwest Passage from the Atlantic Ocean to Asia. The wreck of HMS Terror has not yet been found. Here, Ronca takes measurements of a cannon muzzle that rests with loose timbers on the starboard stern of the Erebus.

    Astern of the wreck, Filippo Ronca measures the muzzle bore diameter of one of two cannons found on the site, serving to identify this gun as a brass 6-pounder.

    Two-man Parks Canada teams conducted seven dives in all for about 12 hours of investigation so far, underwater archeologist Ryan Harris says.

    Ronca measures the inner diameter of the Massy pump and pump tube, next top the main mast stump on the port side of the Erebus.

    During training over the past several months, Parks Canada divers more used to scuba gear familiarized themselves with the navy's ice diving equipment and strict safety protocols.

    Navy divers, who are more familiar with underwater tasks such as mine countermeasures, routine and emergency underwater repairs and explosive ordnance disposal, learned about underwater archeology techniques.

    "Our divers, they're great at working underwater, but we're going to a national historic site here, a very significant wreck that's been untouched primarily by anybody yet," says navy Lt. Greg Oikle, who is lead planner of the dive team.

    "We wanted to make sure that our divers were prepared to go down and do the work that Parks Canada needs done without disturbing it."

    As much as people are curious about what lies inside Erebus, Harris says it's important to get the baseline recording done before archeological efforts proceed more significantly and systematically into the ship's interior.

    Peeking inside

    Still, archeologists will be peering inside Erebus, which along with HMS Terror, was beset in ice in 1846 and abandoned two years later off the west side of King William Island, according to Inuit accounts.

    "We'll definitely be exploring with what we call a POV camera … on a telescopic pole," says Harris.

    hi-erebus-terror-cp-3247639-8col
    HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, shown in the Illustrated London News published on May 24, 1845, left England that year under the command of Sir John Franklin and in the search of the Northwest Passage. (Illustrated London News/Getty Images)

    "We're going to try to shimmy that [camera] into some of the little nooks and crannies to try to peer below the height of the weather deck and perhaps even farther below that."

    Harris says they are prepared for a "limited amount of artifact recovery."

    The ice dive — done in conjunction with and support from Joint Task Force (North)'s annual high Arctic sovereignty operation, Nunalivut — is in many ways an unprecedented partnership.

    'Middle of nowhere'

    It's also a logistical challenge, particularly given the remote — and undisclosed — location. Plans call for a C-130 Hercules transport aircraft and smaller Twin Otters to ferry all the equipment and people around.

    "We're … in the middle of nowhere on this dive so if we don't bring things with us, we don't have them," says Lyver.

    HMS Erebus replica bell
    A replica of the bell from HMS Erebus, which was recovered late last summer, is the centrepiece of an exhibit that will travel to Canadian museums. (Janet Davison/CBC)

    That means bringing everything from heaters, tents, water and food — individual meal packets like soldiers consume and which Oikle is not overly enthused about — to a decompression chamber and a doctor to ensure prompt care if a diving emergency arises.

    As logistically challenging as the Erebus dive is, there is also a great sense of anticipation around it.

    Jim Balsillie, former chairman and co-chief executive of BlackBerry-maker Research in Motion, who is involved in the Parks Canada-led search, will be at the dive camp for about five days as a guest.

    "I'm very excited to get up there," says Balsillie, who along with Tim MacDonald founded the Arctic Research Foundation, which has supported the search for several years.

    "I'm looking forward to seeing what they are going to bring up. I wonder if they're going to solve a couple riddles and mysteries and start a couple more while they're at it," Balsillie says.

    Topping his list of potential finds would be a wax-sealed canister with documents in it, something he thinks is possible, given the disciplined code British naval officers had.

    Answering the big questions

    Oikle and Lyver are also enthused.

    "To be able to come up here and be a part of this operation and explore and hopefully answer some of the questions that the world has been asking, it's truly significant for me, a pinnacle in my career really," says Lyver.

    For Harris, who has recalled the "Stanley Cup" moment of first spotting Erebus on a sonar screen, the anticipation is long-term, and includes whatever the material remains left behind by the sailors can ultimately reveal about their experiences.

    Who were the final survivors among Franklin's 128 crewmen? What were they trying to accomplish?

    "Did they still maintain any hope of sailing this ship into the Beaufort Sea or were they more or less hunkered down and waiting for the end?" says Harris.

    "And then there's a whole line of questions we need to explore with respect to the Inuit experience with this wreck site."
    ■Franklin find proves 'Inuit oral history is strong'

    At this point, the answer to so many of those questions is simple: Who knows?

    "The exciting thing about archeology comes in the surprises," says Harris.

    "We can have a reconstruction of what happened but ultimately the archeology will inevitably present its particular surprises. It can be quite shocking when it does."
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 6, 2015
  3. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hms-e...e-of-ice-dive-to-franklin-shipwreck-1.3035545
    COMING UP LIVE
    HMS Erebus video to offer glimpse of ice dive to Franklin shipwreck

    Holes cut through two-metre-thick Arctic ice to give divers access to wooden ship

    CBC News Posted: Apr 16, 2015 10:06 AM ET| Last Updated: Apr 16, 2015 11:44 AM ET

    Divers break through the ice in the Canadian Arctic in April 2015 for an unprecedented exploration of the wreck of Franklin's HMS Erebus, part of Sir John Franklin's doomed expedition.

    Parks Canada underwater archeologist Jonathan Moore drills a hole in the ice. The diving operation takes place on the Arctic sea ice, beneath which the HMS Erebus has been for nearly 170 years.

    Huge ice blocks glisten under the sun at the Erebus Dive Camp. Access to the wreck will come through three triangular holes bored through the ice — each side of the triangle will be about two metres long.

    The Erebus Dive Camp fades into the twilight in Nunavut. Thick ice forms a launch platform for the diving operation and provides a base for the camp, home to 32 Parks Canada and Royal Canadian Navy team members.

    Parks Canada and Royal Canadian Navy divers prepare for the icy plunge during a training exercise near Quebec City in March, ahead of the Arctic mission.

    The training exercises take place from March 2-6 in the St. Lawrence River.

    Marc-André Bernier, chief of underwater archeology for Parks Canada, takes part in a test dive in Quebec.

    Bernier shows off the Erebus Medal to navy divers near the practice site in Quebec where the two government groups work out the intricacies of the Arctic mission.

    A navy operator checks a decompression unit during a test dive. The training sessions allow Parks Canada underwater archeologists to familiarize themselves with the navy's ice diving equipment and safety protocols, while navy members learn about underwater archeology techniques.
    Once in the water, the divers verify each other’s suit for leaks before dipping below the surface, where they can stay in the -2 C water for over an hour, Bernier says.

    Divers break through the ice in the Canadian Arctic in April 2015 for an unprecedented exploration of the wreck of Franklin's HMS Erebus, part of Sir John Franklin's doomed expedition. (Parks Canada)

    External Links

    ■Parks Canada: Breaking the Ice - HMS Erebus revealed http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/culture/franklin/index.aspx

    (Note: CBC does not endorse and is not responsible for the content of external links.)

    Footage expected to be released later today will reveal the first glimpses of divers plunging deep below thick Arctic sea ice to get "an up-close-and-personal look" at the wreck of the Franklin Expedition's HMS Erebus.

    Holes have been cut through the ice, which is now about two metres deep, to give Royal Canadian Navy divers and Parks Canada underwater archeologists a chance to continue exploration of the 19th-century wreck discovered late last summer in the Queen Maud Gulf off Nunavut.
    ■Ice dive team ready to discover more secrets of HMS Erebus
    ■The Franklin story: Learn more about the doomed expedition
    ■The Nature of Things: Franklin's Lost Ships

    Park Canada says the video, planned to be released at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto at 1 p.m. ET, will provide an "up-close-and-personal" look at the ship that was one half of the ill-fated polar expedition led by Sir John Franklin in the 1840s.

    Franklin expedition underwater inspection
    A Parks Canada diver measures part of the Franklin expedition's Erebus on Sept 18, 2014. (Thierry Boyer/Parks Canada)

    The video, and photos released Wednesday, provide the first public look at a complex operation that is being done in conjunction with Joint Task Force (North)'s annual high Arctic sovereignty operation, Nunalivut.

    Underwater archeologists anticipate that spring diving conditions would will create good viewing opportunities for the wreck, which was found in water about 11 metres deep.

    The amount of ice cover eliminates wave action, and any particulate in the water will have settled down to the sea floor, creating ideal conditions for recording details of the ship.

    "It's almost like diving in an aquarium," Ryan Harris, a senior underwater archeologist for Parks Canada, said earlier this month.

    Unlocking mysteries

    Dives are expected to continue until Friday, weather permitting.

    Underwater archeologists, who will be using a new high-tech, 3-D laser scanning tool, want to create a thorough recording of the wreck before delving more deeply within it.

    Inside the reinforced wooden warship, however, lies huge potential for revealing answers to some of the many mysteries surrounding the sad fate of the expedition launched in a quest to find the Northwest Passage.

    Are there journals or notes safely sealed inside cannisters where British sailors renowned for documentation may have kept records of what was happening on the expedition? Are there human remains?

    PARKS CANADA - Recovery of the bell of the HMS Erebus
    Parks Canada senior underwater archeologist Filippo Ronca shines his light on the bell discovered in the wreck of HMS Erebus late in the summer of 2014. (Parks Canada)

    Maybe there will be something that can shed more light on whether lead played a significant role in the demise of the sailors, as has been the subject of much discussion over the years.

    HMS Erebus was one half of the Franklin expedition, along with HMS Terror, which left England with 128 crew members amid much hope and optimism in 1845. But the ships were beset by ice in 1846 and abandoned two years later off the west side of King William Island, according to Inuit accounts.

    Erebus was discovered late last summer, and underwater archeologists recovered the ship's bell. They had a chance to do limited diving around the wreck, which is covered in kelp, before blustery weather prompted a retreat from the site.

    The search for HMS Terror is expected to continue this summer.
     
  4. GLG

    GLG Well-Known Member

    I have mixed feelings about this whole project.
    We seem to be spending a fortune on finding these dead sailors and yet the ones that live, here in the now, we short change them by slashing their budgets and closing stations. I would like to know how much has this Franklin project costed us to date and what is the estimated yearly cost. This was started in 2008 and with one more shipwreck to find we could be at it for a while.


    [TVY8LoM47xI]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVY8LoM47xI
     
    shuswap likes this.
  5. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

    Like the Kitsilano Station, right GLG?

    Maybe they will find "Pandas" - and nobody will look at the oil spill any longer.....unless - of course...the Pandas get covered in oil...

    <iframe width="640" height="360" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/A7dU8KHQ_sI?feature=player_embedded" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    Annual expenses are expected to be $3 million. The panda exhibit also cost almost $8 million to build. Photo op? - priceless.

    Is that Harper sharing a picture of his pet chinchilla with the panda-lady?

    Ya - I know - wrong thread...
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 16, 2015
  6. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

    Attached Files:

  7. Califbill

    Califbill Member

    What caused the warming then, to melt all the ice, so they could sail that far?
     
  8. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

    Panda Poo. Ask OBD.
     
  9. Califbill

    Califbill Member

    Panda poo would not do it. Panda flatulence maybe.
     
  10. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

  11. tubber

    tubber Well-Known Member

    I educate the kids on my teams by playing non-stop Stan Rogers in the car on road trips. Funny they all play rock, paper,scissors to not ride with me on the way home. The Franklin expedition is a part of Canadian history with lots of unsolved mystery mixed in. We are a rich country. We can afford to know more.
     
  12. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/h...-help-crack-mysteries-of-hms-erebus-1.3042222

    How laser scanning may help crack mysteries of HMS Erebus

    Scanner developed by 2G Robotics of Waterloo, Ont., helping Parks Canada explore wreck in Nunavut

    By Janet Davison, CBC News Posted: Apr 22, 2015 11:00 AM ET| Last Updated: Apr 22, 2015 1:42 PM ET

    A diver with Parks Canada's underwater archaeology service inspects the remains of HMS Erebus underneath the Arctic sea ice in 2015. (Parks Canada)

    Erebus surprise video feed from ocean floor 1:22 http://www.cbc.ca/player/News/Canada/ID/2664439603/

    External Links

    ¡öParks Canada: HMS Erebus revealed http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/culture/franklin/franklin2015.aspx
    ¡ö2G Robotics http://www.2grobotics.com/

    (Note: CBC does not endorse and is not responsible for the content of external links.)

    When Sir John Franklin set sail from England in his 1845 bid to find the Northwest Passage, the reinforced British warships in his expedition were renowned for the scientific and naval innovations on board.

    But none of that technology was enough to save HMS Erebus and HMS Terror from the ravages of thick Arctic ice and all the other forces that conspired to doom the polar expedition and its 129 men.
    ¡öFranklin shipwreck divers offer video tour of HMS Erebus
    ¡ö​Dive team ready for more secrets of Erebus
    ¡ö​Franklin story: Learn more about the expedition

    Now, however, cutting-edge Canadian underwater laser technology is giving Parks Canada a high-tech hand in its efforts to unlock the mysteries hidden within the wreck of the recently discovered HMS Erebus.

    Data gathered by a long-range underwater laser scanner developed by 2G Robotics Inc. of Waterloo, Ont., is helping Parks Canada's underwater archeologists create the detailed 3D scan they want for planning future forays to the Franklin Expedition shipwreck in Nunavut.

    Monohansett underwater image
    Underwater laser scanning technology developed by 2G Robotics of Waterloo, Ont., was used by the the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in early 2014 to explore the Monohansett shipwreck site at the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary in northwestern Lake Huron. (2G Robotics)

    "Whenever you're dealing with archeology, it's often the newest technologies that shed the most light on some of the history of the oldest and most uncertain expeditions," said Jason Gillham, founder and CEO of 2G Robotics.

    There's still a lot of uncertainty surrounding the Franklin Expedition, even though searchers discovered HMS Erebus lying remarkably intact 11 metres below the surface of Queen Maud Gulf late last summer.

    The latest effort to unlock some of the uncertainty wrapped up on April 18, when Parks Canada underwater archeologists and Royal Canadian Navy divers completed six days of diving through the two-metre Arctic ice.

    Because the thick layer of ice eliminates wave action, letting all the particulate settle at the bottom, archeologists considered the conditions prime for deploying the long-range laser scanner Parks Canada bought from 2G Robotics.

    "We want to take advantage of the water clarity to do a very thorough baseline recording of the wreck site before any future interventions take place," Ryan Harris, a senior underwater archeologist for Parks Canada, said in an interview earlier this month.

    "We'll start externally and slowly work towards internal documentation. That is indeed where things are probably going to get quite interesting in the years to come, where we stand to learn, hopefully, what happened."

    Very impressed

    But first, they need the detailed data the long-range scanner can help provide.

    Parks Canada has been "very, very impressed in terms of the amount of data it can collect and the overall accuracy and precision of the data," Harris said.

    Divers break through the ice in the Canadian Arctic in April 2015 for an unprecedented exploration of the wreck of Franklin's HMS Erebus, part of Sir John Franklin's doomed expedition.

    Parks Canada underwater archeologist Jonathan Moore drills a hole in the ice. The diving operation takes place on the Arctic sea ice, beneath which the HMS Erebus has been for nearly 170 years.

    Huge ice blocks glisten under the sun at the Erebus Dive Camp. Access to the wreck will come through three triangular holes bored through the ice ¡ª each side of the triangle will be about two metres long.

    The Erebus Dive Camp fades into the twilight in Nunavut. Thick ice forms a launch platform for the diving operation and provides a base for the camp, home to 32 Parks Canada and Royal Canadian Navy team members.

    Parks Canada and Royal Canadian Navy divers prepare for the icy plunge during a training exercise near Quebec City in March, ahead of the Arctic mission.

    The training exercises take place from March 2-6 in the St. Lawrence River.
    Marc-Andr¨¦ Bernier, chief of underwater archeology for Parks Canada, takes part in a test dive in Quebec.
    Bernier shows off the Erebus Medal to navy divers near the practice site in Quebec where the two government groups work out the intricacies of the Arctic mission.

    A navy operator checks a decompression unit during a test dive. The training sessions allow Parks Canada underwater archeologists to familiarize themselves with the navy's ice diving equipment and safety protocols, while navy members learn about underwater archeology techniques.
    Once in the water, the divers verify each other¡¯s suit for leaks before dipping below the surface, where they can stay in the -2 C water for over an hour, Bernier says.

    2G Robotics developed the long-range underwater laser scanner with guidance from Parks Canada, which was looking for such technology after the 2010 discovery of the wreck of HMS Investigator, a British merchant ship that had been sent to find Erebus and Terror.

    "It's on a stand and it pans around," Harris said of the scanner, noting it sends out a vertical slit of blue-green laser light and registers a three-dimensional image of what it can see.

    Gillham says the core component of the technology are the calibration techniques used to help a diver position the scanner precisely on the sea floor, clearing the way for accurate measurements of the target ¡ª in this case, Erebus.

    Power and ethernet cables connect the scanner to the surface, where an operator in communication with the diver controls the scanner, sweeping the laser over the target. Data gathered in a point cloud will appear live on the operator's screen.

    As the data comes in, it will render the 3D model.

    "There's all sorts of different ways of interacting with it," said Gillham, noting the potential of "everything from creating 3D printings from the data that's been collected through to virtual reality-type interactions to just straight photographs or pictures."

    Not like ordinary pictures

    Those photos aren't quite like anything a regular camera would produce.

    The data comes back with what Gillham calls an "intensity return" that gives "some level of colourization" to every point recorded.

    "You can then colourize that in a whole bunch of different ways ¡* but one of the common ways is just to use grey-scale imagery."

    ULS-500 scanning the Monohansett shipwreck
    2G Robotics' ULS-500 long-range underwater laser scanner scans the wreck of the Monohansett, a rebuilt single-deck lumber carrier that burned and sank in three sections near Thunder Bay Island in 1907. (2G Robotics)

    2G Robotics also loaned Parks Canada a smaller, medium-range underwater scanner that would be able to manoeuvre inside nooks and crannies of Erebus.

    "It would just give [the underwater archeologists] some more flexibility while they were there," said Gillham.

    Work such as Parks Canada's underwater exploration doesn't fall within 2G Robotics' main market, which is energy-based industries such as offshore oil and gas.

    But it does venture into a field that has been a lifelong interest for Gillham.

    "We're always interested in getting involved in the scientific and exploratory-type applications because of the intrigue that they have and the stories around them."

    Other projects

    The company's technology was also deployed after the Costa Concordia sank off the Italian coast in 2012, helping determine where to attach floats to the downed cruise ship.
    ¡öWaterloo robotics firm helps upright Costa Concordia

    Gillham says he wouldn't be surprised if some of the company's customers, who have some of its gear, might be called upon if the missing Malaysian Airlines MH370 jet is found in the Indian Ocean.

    But closer to home, Gillham relishes the chance for his firm's technology to be part of the Franklin Expedition exploration.

    To be able, he said, "to contribute to such an iconic Canadian history story with very new technology is really pretty fascinating for me."
     

    Attached Files:

  13. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

  14. shuswap

    shuswap Active Member

    I think whenever one can find the money to find some lost ships to boost re-election hopes of a government that has made us less safe and sovereign while at the same time screwing over habitat protection and spend money on more useless prisons is definitely in the national interest. We can't protect Parliament Hill from a terrorist wannabe with a 30-30 rifle let alone the Russians from taking over Ellesmere Island. But keep looking for those lost ships! Wild Salmon Policy and Universal Child Care can wait.
     
  15. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

    Amen Shuswap!
     
  16. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

  17. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

  18. KV1

    KV1 Active Member

    What a waste of money and resources. Arrogant captain who killed his crew and who cannabalized each other. Why are we celebrating and pursuing it to no end. Been to the arctic to the spot where the ships were thought to be nothing but wasteland. Natural resources never to be extracted due to logistics. Ridiculous money pits for photo ops!
     
  19. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

    I think you answered your own question KV!...
     
  20. agentaqua

    agentaqua Well-Known Member

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